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Inselstreit | Liu Wencai | Geschichte
Aug 4th, 2016 by Gao

Alfred Gerstl: Südchinesisches Meer: Friedliche Lösung im Interesse aller (Reispapier)

Der Spruch des Internationalen Schiedshofes über den Streit zwischen den Philippinen und China hat weitgehende Folgen für die Territorialkonflikte im Südchinesischen Meer. An einer diplomatischen Lösung führt jedoch kein Weg vorbei – sie liegt im Interesse aller Beteiligten.

Vanessa Piao: Grandson of China’s Most-Hated Landlord Challenges Communist Lore (New York Times)

Sorghum and Steel. The Socialist Developmental Regime and the Forging of China (chuang)

The story we tell below explains the century-long creation of China as an economic entity. Unlike the nationalists, we do not hope to uncover any secret lineage of culture, language or ethnicity in order to explain the unique character of today’s China. Unlike many leftists, we also do not seek to trace out the “red thread” in history, discovering where the socialist project “went wrong” and what could have been done to achieve communism in some alternate universe. Instead, we aim to inquire into the past in order to understand our present moment. What does the current slowdown in Chinese growth bode for the global economy? What hope, if any, do contemporary struggles in China hold for any future communist project?
Our long-term goal is to answer these questions—to compose a coherent communist perspective on China not muddied by the romance of dead revolutions or the hysteria of rapid growth rates. Below we offer the first in a three-part history of the emergence of China out of the global imperatives of capitalist accumulation. In this issue we cover the explicitly non-capitalist portion of this history, the socialist era and its immediate precursors, which saw the development of the first modern industrial infrastructure on the East Asian mainland…
This first section covers the non-capitalist period, in which the popular movement led by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) succeeded in both destroying the old regime and halting the transition to capitalism, leaving the region stuck in an inconsistent stasis understood at the time to be “socialism.”

Bildungswesen und Sozialchauvinismus
Jun 14th, 2016 by Gao

Javier C. Hernández: China Tries to Redistribute Education to the Poor, Igniting Class Conflict | 中国高校录取名额之争引发阶层对立 (New York Times)

Parents in at least two dozen Chinese cities have taken to the streets in recent weeks to denounce a government effort to expand access to higher education for students from less developed regions. The unusually fierce backlash is testing the Communist Party’s ability to manage class conflict, as well as the political acumen of its leader, Xi Jinping.
The nation’s cutthroat university admissions process has long been a source of anxiety and acrimony. But the breadth and intensity of the demonstrations, many of them organized on social media, appear to have taken the authorities by surprise.
At issue is China’s state-run system of higher education, in which top schools are concentrated in big prosperous cities, mostly on the coast, and weaker, underfunded schools dominate the nation’s interior. Placement is determined almost exclusively by a single national exam, the gaokao, which was administered across China starting on Tuesday. The test is considered so important to one’s fate that many parents begin preparing their children for it before kindergarten. The government has threatened to imprison cheaters for up to seven years.
The exam gives the admissions system a meritocratic sheen, but the government also reserves most spaces in universities for students in the same city or province, in effect making it harder for applicants from the hinterlands to get into the nation’s best schools…

Feministinnen | Streik bei Cuiheng
Apr 19th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong: China Releases 5 Women’s Rights Activists Detained for Weeks (New York Times)
Sui-lee Wee: China frees five women activists on bail after outcry (Reuters)
5 feminists released! Also: environmental struggles and the Great Cannon (Chuang)

China has unexpectedly released five women activists on bail, two lawyers said on Monday, after a vocal campaign against their detention by the West and Chinese rights campaigners.
The women were taken into custody on the weekend of March 8, International Women’s Day, and detained on suspicion of „picking quarrels and provoking trouble“. They had planned to demonstrate against sexual harassment on public transport.

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian: Online Support — and Mockery — Await Chinese Feminists After Release (Foreign Policy)
Detention of Five Chinese Feminist Activists at the Juncture of Beijing+20 – An Interview with Gender Scholar Wang Zheng (China Change)

Professor Wang Zheng (王政), of the University of Michigan, is a scholar whose research focuses on the modern and contemporary history of Chinese women and gender, and Chinese feminism in the era of globalization. Since 1993, Professor Wang has been working with Chinese domestic feminist scholars to promote feminist scholarship and establish courses in women studies and gender studies. She has also participated in the feminist movement itself in China over the years. On April 3rd, Professor Wang gave a speech at Brookings Institute in Washington, DC, about the recent arrest of the five Chinese feminists (starts around 48:00). On April 7th, the editor of this website talked to Professor Wang, further discussing the Chinese and global background of the incident and how it will impact the women’s rights movement in China.

Alexandria Icenhower: What China’s sexual revolution means for women (Brookings)
张红萍:1913 被抓捕的女权主义者们(法制网)

这些1905年就加入同盟会的女会员们,革命多年,并于辛亥革命时穿行于枪林弹雨中。昨日她们还是巾帼英雄,今日她们就成了国家的罪犯。当通缉令张贴满北京的大街小巷时,“女子参政同盟会”的女子们黯然神伤,挥泪告别她们的聚集地,结束了1904年她们就开始从事的女权运动

Josh Chin: A Reduced Sentence Shines Light on China’s Little-Known Opposition Parties (Wall Street Journal)

High profile strike at Zhongshan bag manufacturer enters tenth day (China Labour Bulletin)
Worker activism is now the new normal as strikes and protests erupt across China (China Labour Bulletin)

Dinny McMahon: Economists React: China’s Economic Growth Slows (Wall Street Journal)

Heather Timmons: Asia’s largest IPO this year is the latest sign that Chinese investors are ignoring reality (Quartz)

China’s stock markets have become completely detached from economic fundamentals in recent months, and that insanity is rapidly spilling into Hong Kong’s Stock Exchange. The latest evidence of irrational exuberance comes from the $3.6 billion IPO of GF Securities, a Chinese broker whose stock started up 40% in its Hong Kong trading debut today, in Asia’s largest listing this year.

Taxi drivers in Xiangtan create their own company in push for industry reform (China Labour Bulletin)

Andrew Browne: Vietnam’s Impossible Bind: How to Stand Up to Beijing (Wall Street Journal)

China’s military development a key theme in defense paper (Japan News / Yomiuri Shimbun)

Xu Beina: Media Censorship in China (Council on Foreign Relations)

Ian Johnson: China: What the Uighurs See (New York Review of Books)

Xinjiang is one of those remote places whose frequent mention in the international press stymies true understanding. Home to China’s Uighur minority, this vast region of western China is mostly known for being in a state of permanent low-grade conflict, with terrorist attacks and a ferocious government crackdown, even against moderate Uighur academics. To the outside world, Xinjiang conjures up a series of stock adjectives or phrases: “restive,” “Muslim,” “oppressed,” and—as the misleading titles of more than one recent book have it—China’s “Wild West.”
And yet few outsiders spend much time there. Foreign academics have largely been barred from research, with several prominent scholars of Xinjiang banned from entering China. Foreign journalists tend to fly in and out for a dateline and an interview. The American photographer Carolyn Drake is an exception.
Drake has been traveling to Xinjiang since 2007, when she began photographing Central Asia from her base in Istanbul. Over the years, she has come to know the region well, and struggled to break free from its clichés. The summation of her work is Wild Pigeon, an ambitious, beautiful, and crushingly sad book.

Frauentag
Mrz 10th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong: China Detains Several Women’s Rights Activists (New York Times)

China detained at least 10 women’s rights activists over the weekend to forestall a nationwide campaign against sexual harassment on public transportation that was to overlap with International Women’s Day, according to human rights advocates and associates of those detained.
At least five of the detained were still being held on Sunday evening, while the others had been released after being interrogated. All were women…
Most or all of the women were working to mobilize a nationwide campaign against sexual harassment on subways and other public transportation, their friends said. People partaking in the campaign were supposed to put antiharassment stickers on transit vehicles.

新婦女協進會關於敦促中國政府釋放女權活動家的聲明 (Google Docs)

香港婦女、性別團體對北京當局在未有充份理據的情況下,跨省拘捕五名知名的女權活動家,包括北京的李婷婷(麥子),韋婷婷,王曼,杭州的武嶸嶸和廣州的鄭楚然(大兔),表示嚴重關注,並敦促北京公安當局,尊重並恪守憲法賦予人民的言論自由,確保各相關人士的司法權利,予以律師及家人會見,確保其人身安全,並在未能查證有違法行為的情況下,立即釋放各人。……
就此,我們呼籲中國政府面對社會種種議題,應以實事求是的態度處理,完善立法、落實執行,才是解決問題的根本;而非拘禁提出問題的人,將其滅聲。我們再次強調對事件的關注,並將繼續跟進,直到上述各人得到釋放。

HKAAF: Signature Campaign to demand the release of the prominent feminists from Mainland (HKAAF / Google Docs)

Women and sexuality groups in Hong Kong express grave concern with the recent arrests by the Beijing authorities of five prominent female activists, including Li Tingting (李婷婷)(also known as Maizi麥子), Wei Tingting (韋婷婷), Wang Man (王曼) in Beijing, Wu Rongrong (武嶸嶸) in Hangzhou, and Zheng Churang (鄭楚然) (also known as Datu) in Guangzhou, but apparently with no solid legal ground. We urge the Beijing police to respect the freedom of speech as prescribed in the PRC Constitution, and ensure that the women’s legal procedural rights including rights to meet with lawyers and families, and rights to personal safety are strictly observed. We urge for their immediate release in so far as no sufficient evidence can be found to accuse them of any illegal act…
[W]e call for the Chinese government to look into the issues of social concerns genuinely, and resolve them with tenability by enhancing the standard of the laws and their implementation, instead of just maneuvering to quell the voice of the whistle blowers. We, the undersigned, would like to reiterate hereby our grave concerns of this recent series of arrests, and we will continue to monitor the situation unless the cases are handled with justice and activists are released.

Calling for Beijing Police to Release Chinese Feminist Activists Detained before International Women’s Day (EverMemo)
Simon Denyer, Xu Yangjingjing (sic): Detention of women’s rights activists casts shadow over China’s parliament meeting (Washington Post)

Meanwhile, Premier Li Keqiang quoted Mao Zedong’s famous assertion on Sunday that “women hold up half the sky,” and assured female lawmakers at the NPC that “you should believe that your male counterparts, holders of the other half of the sky, will move forward hand-in-hand with you.” …
[S]tate media continued its stunningly sexist coverage of the NPC sessions, desperately trying to glamorize the stage-managed affair with endless slideshows of the female volunteers employed to show delegates to their seats and pour them tea, and of the “beautiful” female reporters covering events.

Simon Denyer: Battered women in China could finally get a measure of legal protection (Washington Post)
Lily Kuo: China completely flunked International Women’s Day (Quartz)

China celebrated International Women’s Day by locking up at least eight female activists who had been planning a rally against sexual harassment this weekend. Instead of rallies for women’s rights, the holiday was marked by events in shopping malls where men wearing high heels raced through obstacle courses.

Coco Feng, Jane Li, Echo Hui: China’s “factory girls” have grown up—and are going on strike (Quartz)

Yang Liyan, a 30-year-old migrant worker, says she has cried twice in the past year. Once was when she was having her first meal in jail, and again after she was released and talking to her co-workers about her ordeal over dinner.
Yang was waiting for a scheduled meeting with the management of the Xinsheng Shoe Factory in the industrial metropolis of Guangzhou on Nov. 3, 2014, when she was thrown into the back of a police van. A total of 14 workers, including Yang and several other women, had gathered on behalf of 114 co-workers to fight for the severance pay they said they were owed after a three-month strike. They were arrested for “sabotaging production and business operations” (破坏生产经营), and in Yang’s case, jailed for 25 days.

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