SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
Xinjiang
Dez 3rd, 2016 by Gao

Zhao Yusha: Xinjiang tightens passport policy to maintain social order (Global Times / archive.org – Das Original ist nicht mehr on-line.)

Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has tightened passport regulations, requiring all residents to hand in their passports to local police stations for examination and management.
An anonymous police officer in Aksu prefecture confirmed with the Global Times on Wednesday that all citizens in Aksu are required to hand their passports, be it a private passport or passport for public affairs, to the police stations. The passports will be managed by the police.
„Anyone who needs the passport must apply to the police station,“ said the source, adding that the passport management policy is implemented throughout Xinjiang.
The Public Security Bureau in Shihezi city gave the same directive on its official Weibo account on October 19, saying that it was for „annual examination“ purposes…
A local official in Xinjiang told the Global Times on Wednesday that the Xinjiang government had loosened control over residents‘ passports in 2015. The current policy tightening aims mainly to maintain social order, he noted.
Getting a passport is often complicated and takes more time in Xinjiang than in other provinces, given the rising threat of terrorism in the region and the government’s ongoing anti-terrorism campaign, said the official.

China sammelt Pässe in Unruheprovinz ein (Zeit)

Die Einwohner von Xinjiang dürfen nicht mehr beliebig ausreisen. Sie müssen ihre Reisepässe abgeben. Die muslimische Minderheit spricht von Unterdrückung.

Xinjiang residents told to turn in passports (AlJazeera)

In June, local state-run media reported that the mostly Kazakh residents of a Xinjiang border district had to give police DNA samples, fingerprints, voiceprints and a „three-dimensional image“ in order to apply for certain travel documents, including passports.

Lucy Hornby: China orders Xinjiang residents to hand in passports (Financial Times)
Passports Arbitrarily Recalled in Xinjiang (Human Rights Watch)

The passport recall in Xinjiang has no basis in Chinese law.
Article 2 of China’s Passport Law states that “no organization or individual should illegally … seize passports.” Article 15 states that the courts, the procuratorates [office of the prosecutor], the police, the state security, and administrative supervisory authorities can seize passports only “where necessary for handling a case,” and only the passports “of the parties of a case.”

Zhao Yusha, Cui Meng: Xinjiang officials deny holding ordinary citizens’ passports (Global Times)

Sources from Xinjiang police denied that the government is holding ordinary citizens‘ passports, noting that the government only holds passports of those who are suspected of having links to terrorism.
A source from Urumqi, capital of Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, told the Global Times that local police are not holding residents‘ passports except for those with suspicious connections.
The source in Urumqi said that some local governments in Xinjiang may have misunderstood the passport management policy.

Hongkong | Arzneimittel | Internet
Nov 9th, 2016 by Gao

全国人民代表大会常务委员会:关于《中华人民共和国香港特别行政区基本法》第一百零四条的解释(新华社)

《中华人民共和国香港特别行政区基本法》第一百零四条规定相关公职人员“就职时必须依法宣誓”,具有以下含义:
  (一)宣誓是该条所列公职人员就职的法定条件和必经程序。未进行合法有效宣誓或者拒绝宣誓,不得就任相应公职,不得行使相应职权和享受相应待遇。
  (二)宣誓必须符合法定的形式和内容要求。宣誓人必须真诚、庄重地进行宣誓,必须准确、完整、庄重地宣读包括“拥护中华人民共和国香港特别行政区基本法,效忠中华人民共和国香港特别行政区”内容的法定誓言。

Huang Zheping, Heather Timmons: Two democratically elected Hong Kong lawmakers have been banned from taking office by Beijing (Quartz)

China’s top law-making body issued a rare interpretation of the Basic Law that governs Hong Kong on Monday (Nov. 7) that effectively ousts two democratically elected officials from office permanently. The action by Beijing, which has increasingly tightened its grip on free speech and demonstrations in Hong Kong after 2014’s Umbrella Movement protests, could spark widespread protests in a city where demonstrators have already taken to the streets over the issue.
Yau Wai-ching and Baggio Leung, who represent the Youngspiration political party, won seats in September elections to Hong Kong’s Legislative Council (LegCo), but after using a derogatory term to refer to the mainland and declaring Hong Kong was not part of China during their swearing-in session in October, were barred from office. The Hong Kong government has legally challenged the validity of their oaths, but the interpretation by Beijing effectively supersedes Hong Kong’s local judicial system.
The interpretation, issued by Beijing’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee on Monday morning, states that when assuming office, lawmakers and principal officials others must “correctly, completely, and solemnly” swear according to the scripted oath, including the part saying “I will uphold the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China and bear allegiance to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China.”

Raymond Yeung, Danny Mok, Josh Ye, Clifford Lo, Elizabeth Cheung: Four arrested after violence at thousands-strong rally over Beijing’s review of Basic Law (South China Morning Post)

Traffic resumed early Monday on Des Voeux Road, marking the end of a tense stand-off overnight between police and protesters outside the central government’s liaison office in Sai Wan.
The clash between officers and the 4,000-strong crowd gathered in the area to protest against Beijing’s intervention in the oath-taking saga saw the use of pepper spray by police, while one officer was allegedly injured by protesters hurling bricks.
Police said in total four people were arrested, including two men and a woman, aged from 39 to 65, for allegedly obstructing police officers. League of Social Democrats chairman Avery Ng Man-yuen said on his Facebook account that he was among the arrested and had been released on bail.

Ellie Ng: ‘Protect the rule of law’: Beijing defends ruling that effectively bans pro-independence politicians (Hong Kong Free Press)
Editorial: A necessary intervention to keep separatists out of public office (South China Morning Post)
Eric Cheung, Tom Phillips: Hong Kong: lawyers and activists march against Beijing ‚meddling‘ (Guardian)

More than 2,000 lawyers and activists have paraded through Hong Kong in silence and dressed in black to protest against Beijing’s unprecedented intervention in the former British colony’s supposedly independent legal system as a means of ousting two democratically elected pro-independence politicians.

Ellie Ng: ‘World city no more’: Hong Kong professionals censure Beijing’s intervention in local laws (Hong Kong Free Press)

CRI: 324 arrested in China’s vaccine scandal so far (China Daily)

Another 27 suspects have been arrested for the vaccine scandal revealed last March in east China’s Shandong province, adding the total number of the arrested to 324.
The number is released by Cao Jianming, procurator-general of China’s Supreme People’s Procuratorate.
100 officials have been put under investigation under suspicion of taking bribes, abuse of power, and negligence, according to the authority.
The scandal which shocked and stunned the public was first unveiled in March, 2016.
The main suspect Pang Hongwei, a former pharmacist at a hospital in Shandong, and her 21-year-old daughter were found illegally selling 12 different kinds of vaccines, 2 kinds of immune globulin and one kind of therapeutic product across the country.

Sue-Lin Wong, Michael Martina: China adopts cyber security law in face of overseas opposition (Reuters)

China adopted a controversial cyber security law on Monday to counter what Beijing says are growing threats such as hacking and terrorism, but the law triggered concerns among foreign business and rights groups.
The legislation, passed by China’s largely rubber-stamp parliament and set to take effect in June 2017, is an „objective need“ of China as a major internet power, a parliament official said.
Overseas critics of the law say it threatens to shut foreign technology companies out of various sectors deemed „critical“, and includes contentious requirements for security reviews and for data to be stored on servers in China.
Rights advocates also say the law will enhance restrictions on China’s Internet, already subject to the world’s most sophisticated online censorship mechanism, known outside China as the Great Firewall…
Contentious provisions remained in the final draft issued by the parliament, including requirements for „critical information infrastructure operators“ to store personal information and important business data in China, provide unspecified „technical support“ to security agencies, and pass national security reviews.

Paul Mozur: China’s Internet Controls Will Get Stricter, to Dismay of Foreign Business (New York Times)

In August, business groups around the world petitioned China to rethink a proposed cybersecurity law that they said would hurt foreign companies and further separate the country from the internet…
Officials say the rules will help stop cyberattacks and help prevent acts of terrorism, while critics say they will further erode internet freedom. Business groups worry that parts of the law — such as required security checks on companies in industries like finance and communications, and mandatory in-country data storage — will make foreign operations more expensive or lock them out altogether. Individual users will have to register their real names to use messaging services in China.

Kaiser Kuo: Why are so many first-generation Chinese immigrants supporting Donald Trump? (SupChina)

Feministinnen | Streik bei Cuiheng
Apr 19th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong: China Releases 5 Women’s Rights Activists Detained for Weeks (New York Times)
Sui-lee Wee: China frees five women activists on bail after outcry (Reuters)
5 feminists released! Also: environmental struggles and the Great Cannon (Chuang)

China has unexpectedly released five women activists on bail, two lawyers said on Monday, after a vocal campaign against their detention by the West and Chinese rights campaigners.
The women were taken into custody on the weekend of March 8, International Women’s Day, and detained on suspicion of „picking quarrels and provoking trouble“. They had planned to demonstrate against sexual harassment on public transport.

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian: Online Support — and Mockery — Await Chinese Feminists After Release (Foreign Policy)
Detention of Five Chinese Feminist Activists at the Juncture of Beijing+20 – An Interview with Gender Scholar Wang Zheng (China Change)

Professor Wang Zheng (王政), of the University of Michigan, is a scholar whose research focuses on the modern and contemporary history of Chinese women and gender, and Chinese feminism in the era of globalization. Since 1993, Professor Wang has been working with Chinese domestic feminist scholars to promote feminist scholarship and establish courses in women studies and gender studies. She has also participated in the feminist movement itself in China over the years. On April 3rd, Professor Wang gave a speech at Brookings Institute in Washington, DC, about the recent arrest of the five Chinese feminists (starts around 48:00). On April 7th, the editor of this website talked to Professor Wang, further discussing the Chinese and global background of the incident and how it will impact the women’s rights movement in China.

Alexandria Icenhower: What China’s sexual revolution means for women (Brookings)
张红萍:1913 被抓捕的女权主义者们(法制网)

这些1905年就加入同盟会的女会员们,革命多年,并于辛亥革命时穿行于枪林弹雨中。昨日她们还是巾帼英雄,今日她们就成了国家的罪犯。当通缉令张贴满北京的大街小巷时,“女子参政同盟会”的女子们黯然神伤,挥泪告别她们的聚集地,结束了1904年她们就开始从事的女权运动

Josh Chin: A Reduced Sentence Shines Light on China’s Little-Known Opposition Parties (Wall Street Journal)

High profile strike at Zhongshan bag manufacturer enters tenth day (China Labour Bulletin)
Worker activism is now the new normal as strikes and protests erupt across China (China Labour Bulletin)

Dinny McMahon: Economists React: China’s Economic Growth Slows (Wall Street Journal)

Heather Timmons: Asia’s largest IPO this year is the latest sign that Chinese investors are ignoring reality (Quartz)

China’s stock markets have become completely detached from economic fundamentals in recent months, and that insanity is rapidly spilling into Hong Kong’s Stock Exchange. The latest evidence of irrational exuberance comes from the $3.6 billion IPO of GF Securities, a Chinese broker whose stock started up 40% in its Hong Kong trading debut today, in Asia’s largest listing this year.

Taxi drivers in Xiangtan create their own company in push for industry reform (China Labour Bulletin)

Andrew Browne: Vietnam’s Impossible Bind: How to Stand Up to Beijing (Wall Street Journal)

China’s military development a key theme in defense paper (Japan News / Yomiuri Shimbun)

Xu Beina: Media Censorship in China (Council on Foreign Relations)

Ian Johnson: China: What the Uighurs See (New York Review of Books)

Xinjiang is one of those remote places whose frequent mention in the international press stymies true understanding. Home to China’s Uighur minority, this vast region of western China is mostly known for being in a state of permanent low-grade conflict, with terrorist attacks and a ferocious government crackdown, even against moderate Uighur academics. To the outside world, Xinjiang conjures up a series of stock adjectives or phrases: “restive,” “Muslim,” “oppressed,” and—as the misleading titles of more than one recent book have it—China’s “Wild West.”
And yet few outsiders spend much time there. Foreign academics have largely been barred from research, with several prominent scholars of Xinjiang banned from entering China. Foreign journalists tend to fly in and out for a dateline and an interview. The American photographer Carolyn Drake is an exception.
Drake has been traveling to Xinjiang since 2007, when she began photographing Central Asia from her base in Istanbul. Over the years, she has come to know the region well, and struggled to break free from its clichés. The summation of her work is Wild Pigeon, an ambitious, beautiful, and crushingly sad book.

Korruption | Tibet | AIIB | Wirtschaft | Umwelt | Personenkult
Apr 6th, 2015 by Gao

Andrew Jacobs: Taking Feminist Battle to China’s Streets, and Landing in Jail (New York Times)

The young Chinese feminists shaved their heads to protest inequality in higher education and stormed men’s restrooms to highlight the indignities women face in their prolonged waits at public toilets.
To publicize domestic violence, two prominent activists, Li Tingting and Wei Tingting, put on white wedding gowns, splashed them with red paint and marched through one of the capital’s most popular tourist districts chanting, “Yes to love, no to violence.”
Media-savvy, fearless and well-connected to feminists outside China, the young activists over the last three years have taken their righteous indignation to the streets, pioneering a brand of guerrilla theater familiar in the West but largely unheard-of in this authoritarian nation.

Ben Blanchard, Clarence Fernandez: Tibet party boss says temples must be propaganda centers (Reuters)

Buddhist temples and monasteries in Tibet must become propaganda centers for the ruling Communist Party, where monks and nuns learn to „revere“ science and appreciate the party’s love, the troubled region’s top Chinese appointed official said…
Writing in the influential fortnightly party magazine Qiushi, Tibet’s Communist Party boss Chen Quanguo said the more than 1,700 temples and monasteries and 46,000 monks and nuns had to be seen by the government as „friends“.
„Let the monks and nuns in the temples and monasteries have a personal feeling of the party and government’s care and warmth; let them feel the party’s benevolence, listen to the party’s words and follow the party’s path,“ Chen wrote in Qiushi, which means „seeking truth“.
He called for temples and monasteries in the region to be outfitted with radios and televisions, as well as newspapers and reading rooms.

Ho-Fung Hung: China Steps Back (New York Times)

Beijing’s plans for a new multilateral Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank have put Washington on edge. More than 40 countries, including major United States allies in Europe, have signed up to join it despite the Obama administration’s objections and warnings.
In fact, the United States government has nothing to fear from the A.I.I.B.; its opposition is misguided. The bank’s creation will not enhance China’s global power at the expense of the United States. If anything, Beijing’s attempt to go multilateral is a step backward: It’s a concession that China’s established practice of promoting bilateral initiatives in the developing world has backfired.

Minxin Pei: China’s economy: Caught in a vicious, stubborn cycle (Fortune)

Beijing must contend with an unhealthy combination of excessive debt, overcapacity, and a lack of new sources of growth…
Chinese industrial production grew only 6.8% in January and February, the slowest since 2008. Real estate sales plunged 15.8% in value. Fixed-asset investment, the principal driver of Chinese growth, recorded anemic growth at 1.05% and 1.03% in January and February, respectively (compared with 1.49% and 1.42% in the same period last year).
Acknowledging this unpleasant reality, Chinese premier Li Keqiang told the attendees of the NPC that China’s GDP growth will be “around 7%” this year.
But achieving growth of 7% may be a tall order.

John Garnaut, Philip Wen: Chinese President’s war on corruption finds its way to Brighton (Age)

President Xi Jinping’s „You Die, I Live“ war against corruption seems a long way from the beachside cul-de-sacs of Brighton. But it has come right to the doorstep of Zheng Jiefu, an Australian resident property developer, who has been trapped in a mafia-style shakedown involving China’s former deputy spy chief and the country’s most wanted man.

Tim Maughan: The dystopian lake filled by the world’s tech lust (BBC)

From where I’m standing, the city-sized Baogang Steel and Rare Earth complex dominates the horizon, its endless cooling towers and chimneys reaching up into grey, washed-out sky. Between it and me, stretching into the distance, lies an artificial lake filled with a black, barely-liquid, toxic sludge.
Dozens of pipes line the shore, churning out a torrent of thick, black, chemical waste from the refineries that surround the lake. The smell of sulphur and the roar of the pipes invades my senses. It feels like hell on Earth.

Austin Ramzy: Xi Jinping’s Sayings Now Available in ‘Little Red App’ (New York Times)

President Xi Jinping of China is the model of a modern multimedia leader. He has appeared in cartoons, been praised in song, had his travels tracked by a very dedicated Weibo account, and had his book on governance translated into at least nine languages.
So an app was obviously next.
Created by a website run by the Central Party School of the Communist Party, the new, free app offers intensive lessons on Mr. Xi. It has 12 features including texts of his speeches and books, news reports, analyses from experts and a map that traces his travels.

Tom Phillips: China’s Xi Jinping launches his ‘Little Red App’ (Telegraph)

During the 1960s and 1970s, Chairman Mao’s ‘Little Red Book’ is said to have been the most printed book in the world, with hundreds of millions of copies produced.
Xi Jinping’s 12.8MB app, which is the handiwork of software designers employed by Beijing’s secretive Communist Party School, has had a more modest start.
By Friday afternoon it had been downloaded just 1,200 times, according to XYO, an app search engine.

Übersetzungen:
Another Shoe Strike, the Silk Road, and a Smashed-up High School (Chuang)

1989
Jun 2nd, 2014 by Gao

Nach wie vor unübertroffen ist die dreistündige Dokumentation The Gate of Heavenly Peace von Carma Hinton und Richard Gordon.

Rückblick auf die Ereignisse aus der Sicht US-amerikanischer Medien:
Mike Chinoy, Craig Stubing, Clayton Dube Assignment: China – Tiananmen Square (YouTube / University of Southern California U.S.-China Institute)

Veranstaltungen in Wien:
4. Juni 1989 – 25 Jahre danach (Institut für Ostasienwissenschaften der Universität Wien)
Gezeigt wurde die WDR-Dokumentation “Tiananmen – 20 Jahre nach dem Massaker” (2009) von Shi Ming und Thomas Weidenbach.
Montag, 2. Juni 2014, 18 Uhr: Dokumentarfilm Tiananmen (D/Ö 2009) und anschließende Diskussion
Dienstag, 3. Juni 2014, 18.30 Uhr: Diskussionsveranstaltung zu Bedeutung und Wirkung des Protests und seiner gewaltsamen Niederschlagung (mit Impulsreferaten von Christian Göbel, Richard Trappl, Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik und einer studentischen Projektgruppe)

Matthias hat folgenden Link geschickt:
Mark Siemons: Was Mainstream ist, bestimmen wir (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

Weitere Artikel:
Anton Pam: Eine gescheiterte Revolution? (gongchao)
Voices from Tiananmen (South China Morning Post)
Twenty-five years since the Tiananmen protests: Legacies of the student-worker divide (Nào/libcom.org)
Long Xinming: Let’s Talk About Tiananmen Square, 1989 My Hearsay is Better Than Your Hearsay (NSNBC)
Edward Wong: Liu Heung Shing on Photographing Tiananmen (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs, Chris Buckley, Jonathan Ansfield: Tales of Army Discord Show Tiananmen Square in a New Light (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Chen Guang on the Soldiers Who Retook Tiananmen Square (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Far From Beijing, Jaded Students Inspired to Protest (New York Times)
Malcolm Moore: Wikileaks: no bloodshed inside Tiananmen Square, cables claim (Telegraph)
Zoe Li, David McKenzie: Crackdown on dissent ahead of Tiananmen Square 25th anniversary (CNN)
Alan Chin: Eyewitness Views: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square (Reuters)
Daniel F. Vukovich: Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989 (Social Science Research Network)
Kate Phillips: Springtime in Tiananmen Square, 1989 (Atlantic)
Terril Yue Jones: Tiananmen Square at 25 (Wilson Quarterly)
Ma Jian: Tiananmen Square 25 years on: ‚Every person in the crowd was a victim of the massacre‘ (Guardian)
Euan McKirdy: Chinese-Australian artist Guo Jian detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Tania Branigan: China to deport Tiananmen Square artist Guo Jian for visa fraud (Guardian)
Tania Branigan: Australian artist arrested for marking Tiananmen anniversary (Guardian)
Sophie Brown: Chinese journalist Gao Yu detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Dan Levin: China Escalating Attack on Google (New York Times)
APA: China blockt (sic) Google vor 25. Jahrestag des Pekinger Massakers (Standard)
APA: Hongkong: Hunderte Menschen demonstrieren vor Tiananmen-Jahrestag (Standard)
吴雨、李鱼:新闻报道刘晓波、许志永获颁美国民主奖 (Deutsche Welle)
翟亚菲:美国民主基金会又“颁奖”骚扰中国(环球时报)
Roy Greenslade: Foreign journalists in China harassed over Tiananmen Square anniversary (Guardian)
Lucy Davies: Tiananmen Square: the calm before the storm (Telegraph)
Chester Yung: Once Marked by Sadness, Hong Kong’s Tiananmen Vigil Now Stirs Anger (Wall Street Journal)
Paramita Ghosh: Book on Tiananmen Square massacre marks 25th anniversary (Hindustan Times)
Brian Becker: Tiananmen: the massacre that wasn’t (Party for Socialism and Liberation)

SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
»  Host:Blogsport   »  Code:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa