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Ungleichheit
Sep 6th, 2017 by Gao

Sidney Leng: China’s dirty little secret: its growing wealth gap (South China Morning Post)

China’s wealth gap has widened for the first time in five years, a fact Beijing chose not to mention in this year’s economic report.
The Gini coefficient, a gauge ranging between zero and one that measures income equality, increased slightly to 0.465 last year, from 0.462 in 2015, according to data released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) this week…
A study from Peking University last year found that the poorest 25 per cent of mainland households owned just 1 per cent of the country’s aggregate wealth, while the richest 1 per cent owned a third of the wealth.

He Huifeng: In China’s richest province, a yawning gap exists between the haves and the have-nots (South China Morning Post)

The coexistence of great wealth and abject poverty in Guangdong shows why narrowing the income gap is a priority of China’s leadership…
Shenzhen’s per capita GDP is now on par with Portugal’s, but the per capita GDP in Qingyuan … was less than a quarter of Shenzhen’s last year, and lower than the national average. Eleven other cities in Guangdong … were also below the national average last year, and in Meizhou, Heyuan, Shanwei and Yunfu per capita GDP was even lower than in Guizhou, China’s most impoverished province…
Guangdong’s wealth gap has grown in the past couple of years, according to Zheng Zizhen, a sociologist and economist with the Guangdong Academy of Social Sciences, a government think-tank in Guangzhou.
“The wealth of families in [major] cities is soaring, driven by the rapid growth in residential property prices,” he said. “But the poorer areas of Guangdong lack the ability to attract enough capital and talent to bring an industrial boom.”
By the numbers, the Pearl River Delta, which includes some of China’s most developed cities, including Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Dongguan and Foshan, covers only 23 per cent of the province but last year it accounted for 79.3 per cent of Guangdong’s economic output, according to official data, up from 79.1 in 2015. The province’s 12 impoverished cities reported average GDP growth of 7.4 per cent last year, according to the provincial development and reform commission, while the Pearl River Delta’s grew by 8.3 per cent.

Zhang Pinghui: Why Xi Jinping cares so much about ending poverty in China: the political significance behind the campaign (South China Morning Post)

Korruption | Hochschulbildung
Sep 10th, 2014 by Gao

Didi Kirsten Tatlow: Ren Jianming on the Fight Against Corruption in China, and His Own Solution (New York Times)

Q: When I talk to ordinary people they support the campaign. But what’s interesting is that many feel that officials have no choice but to be corrupt. Do you agree?
A: It’s true. Take the recent situation in Maoming in Guangdong Province, where two successive party secretaries were corrupt. As they investigated they discovered that lots of officials below them were also corrupt. They all had to give bribes to the party secretary and his predecessor. Think for a moment: a party secretary decides how things are. If they’re about money changing hands, then you have no choice. You bribe, or you give up any hope of promotion. So the number of corrupt officials today is very, very high. At the time of economic reform [around 1978, after Mao’s death], we spoke of “moral problems.” Only a few cadres had moral problems. I’m afraid today it’s the other way round. Only a few do not…
My own take is that the higher the official, the greater the corruption. A university student who has just passed the civil service examinations is honest. When he gets to be the head of a ke [the lowest position on the 27-rung civil service ladder], then head of a chu, a ting and a minister, he will make all kinds of connections. Those connections are corrupt. We say that about 30 percent of chu heads are corrupt. By ting level it’s about 50 percent, ministers about 80 percent. You can work out for yourself what it is on the Politburo. So if the investigations stop with Zhou then you can’t say the movement is being pursued to the end.

中纪委:“公款送月饼”将点名道姓曝光(新华网)

据中央纪委监察部网站消息,纠正“四风”,要紧盯重要时间节点。中秋临近,为进一步落实中央八项规定精神,严防“四风”反弹,中央纪委监察部网站8月10日开通公款送月饼等“四风”问题举报窗,畅通监督举报渠道,同时每周通报各级纪检监察机关查处的违反中央八项规定精神的案件。这是继“五一”前后开设纠正“四风”监督举报直通车之后,再次恢复周周通报,旨在强化监督执纪问责工作,发挥警示和震慑作用,努力还大家一个风清气正的节日。

王岐山:八项规定我得抓五年 先整治官员乱作为(凤凰卫视)

Helen Gao: China’s Education Gap (New York Times)

The percentage of students at Peking University from rural origins, for example, has fallen to about 10 percent in the past decade, down from around 30 percent in the 1990s…
While China has phenomenally expanded basic education for its people, quadrupling its output of college graduates in the past decade, it has also created a system that discriminates against its less wealthy and well-connected citizens, thwarting social mobility at every step with bureaucratic and financial barriers.

Aktuelle Streiks nach Region
Apr 23rd, 2014 by Gao

Folgende Zusammenstellung stammt von „Husunzi“.

Bei Yue Yuen in Dongguan streiken noch immer 10.000–50.000 von 40.000–60.000 Arbeiter_innen:
China sports shoe factory halts production as strike escalates (Financial Times)
东莞裕元罢工诗抄:运动正是高峰!(新生代)

Bei Yue Yuen in Jiangxi streiken 2.000 Arbeiter_innen in Solidarität mit ihren Kolleg_innen in Dongguan:
Jonathan Kaiman: Strike spreads at Chinese supplier to Adidas and Nike (Guardian)

In Henan streiken seit über zwei Wochen tausende Lehrer_innen:
Jiang Pei, Lin Jing, Luisetta Mudie: Henan Teachers Vow to Keep Marching Over Pay Demands (Radio Free Asia)

In Shenzhen streiken seit dem 16. April tausende Busfahrer_innen:
Thousands of bus company workers strike in Shenzhen (China Labour Bulletin)
深圳东部公交千人罢工抗议低待遇 警察强行驱散(新生代)

In Beijing streiken tausend Arbeiter_innen eines Motorenwerkes:
维灵、何山:北京千人罢工争补偿 (Radio Free Asia)

In Foshan streiken seit zwei Tagen Straßenkehrer_innen:
冯雷亮、曾群善:佛山百名环卫工罢工要求涨薪千元 每月收入所剩无几(新生代)

In Dongguan begannen Taxifahrer_innen am 18. April einen Streik:
Dongguan cabbies launch strike amid business slowdown (South China Morning Post)

Außerdem gibt es u.a. Proteste in Maoming gegen den Bau einer Chemiefabrik und Proteste in Wenzhou gegen Übergriffe vonseiten des Städtischen Ordnungsdienstes (城管).

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