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Wukan
Dez 28th, 2016 by Gao

China jails nine over protests in Guangdong “democracy” village (South China Morning Post)

Nine Guangdong villagers have been jail for up to 10 years for taking part in protests in September in a community once seen as a symbol of grass-roots democracy in China.
Villagers in Wukan, 170km northeast of Hong Kong, expressed frustration over the sentencing, which critics said was a warning to others not to stage similar demonstrations.

Wong Lok-to, Ding Wenqi: China Jails Nine Protesters From Guangdong’s Rebel Village of Wukan (Radio Free Asia)

Authorities in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong have handed down jail terms of up to 10 years to nine residents of the rebel village of Wukan following months of mass protests earlier in the year.
Wei Yonghan, Yang Jinzhen, Hong Yongzhong, Wu Fang, Zhuang Songkun, Cai Jialin, Li Chulu, Chen Suzhuan, and Zhang Bingchai stood trial on Dec. 17, mostly on a variety of public order charges, former Wukan resident Zhuang Liehong told RFA.
They were handed prison sentences in on Monday ranging from two to 10 years, he said.
Prosecutors said fellow protester Zhang Bingchai had „published false information via WeChat and manufactured rumors, which had a deleterious effect in the community.“
Wei Yonghan and Yang Jinzhen were found guilty of „organizing and inciting the villagers of Wukan to attend illegal meetings, demonstrations.“
Wei was also convicted of inciting villagers and „other members of the public“ to confrontation with police, throwing stones and bricks at them, and injuring police officers on duty.
Meanwhile, protesters Li Chulu, Cai Jialin, and Zhuang Songkun „rode their motorcycles to intercept passing vehicles, causing serious disruption to traffic,“ according to an indictment notice issued by the Haifeng District People’s Court, which tried them.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom, David Bandurski: From Diamond Village to Wukan (Los Angeles Review of Books)

Protests broke out again in Wukan a couple of months ago after the democratically elected leader of the village, Lin Zulian, was jailed for corruption. He made a public confession on Chinese state television. When the villagers staged more protests in response to what all signs point to as a spurious prosecution and a forced public confession, riot police moved in, arresting villagers. Anxious to avoid a repeat of events in 2011, the authorities were also far more aggressive in dealing with foreign journalists trying to cover the story. I think this was retribution, four years delayed, against the village of Wukan for an experiment many Communist Party leaders surely saw as a dangerous precedent.
This experiment was, in my view, doomed from the start. How could the elected leaders possibly hope to resolve these land issues when leaders at every level over their heads had been complicit, and not only hoped their experiment would fail but had a clear interest in seeing land deals of this kind continue? The Financial Times reported in 2011 that 40 percent of local government revenue in this part of Guangdong came from land financing, basically the sale of cheap village land to property developers. In many cities, the percentage is even higher, and the incentive to take village land for profit is a huge driver of the kinds of cases of abuse and resistance I document.

Qiao Long, Zhuang Liehong: ‚We Called on Trump For Justice in Wukan‘ (Radio Free Asia)
Rammie Chui, Zoe Lai: Behind the scenes: The mainland journalist who writes about China’s human rights (Hong Kong Free Press)

Vatikan | Wukan | Ai Weiwei und Liao Yiwu | Hongkong
Sep 12th, 2016 by Gao

Emanuele Scimia: Possible Sino-Vatican entente will raise a diplomatic storm over Taiwan (Asia Times)

Taiwanese Vice President Chen Chien-jen says Taipei remains an indispensable ally of the Roman Church after his recent trip to the Vatican. But Vatican is moving closer to Beijing and if it decides to cut diplomatic ties with Taipei, small countries in Latin America, Africa and Oceania that maintain formal relations with the island nation might decide to switch to China. The Roman Church will then have to reshape its relationship with Taiwan on a non-diplomatic basis. This will lead to deterioration of the current cross-strait status quo…
Recent news from Hong Kong and Italy, as well as official overtures from Beijing, hint at the possible finalization of an agreement between the Chinese leadership and the Apostolic See that would allow Pope Francis to ordain, with some limitations, bishops in China.

Kevin Lui: Anti-Establishment Hong Kong Legislator Flees Home After Receiving Death Threats (Time)

On Sunday, he received the highest number of votes in the democratically elected half of Hong Kong’s legislature.
But now, Eddie Chu — dubbed the “king of votes” after receiving 84,121 votes in the territory’s Legislative Council election, the most among all candidates running in the five geographical constituencies — has moved out of his home, fearing for the safety of himself and his family.

Wong Lok-to, Yang Fan, Luisetta Mudie: China’s Rebel Village Protests Jailing of Its Former Leader For ‚Bribery‘ (Radio Free Asia)

Authorities in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong have jailed the head of a grassroots democracy movement on „bribery“ charges after he planned to relaunch a campaign of petitioning over his village’s lost farmland.
Lin Zuluan, former ruling Chinese Communist Party secretary for Guangdong’s rebel village of Wukan, was handed a 37-month jail term and a U.S.$60,000 fine after a court in Foshan city found him guilty of taking bribes and of other charges…
Lin admitted taking bribes in a televised „confession,“ but few in Wukan believed it to be genuine, as the authorities had also prevented him from meeting with lawyers hired by his family to defend him.

Jörg Hänztschel: Ai Weiwei: “All I ask for is a normal life” (Süddeutsche Zeitung)

Everybody was surprised by the news that you were allowed to travel. Just recently hundreds of human rights lawyers were detained in China.
Yes, there are some cases where the authorities act quite totalitarian. But it’s very different from when I was detained. Today, when they detain you, they come with arrest orders. Courts decide what kind of treatment these people will get. They follow procedures. And if there is not enough proof they release you. The tactics are not as unlawful as a few years ago. Of course the police have the right to arrest you if they think you’re suspicious. Although I think this is also used as a tactic to control these people.
Still, it looked like the dawn of a new era of repression.
The reason is the anti-corruption campaign by president Xi Jinping. That creates a lot of tension, so they want to make sure they don’t lose control. If they see any sign of unrest they do whatever it takes to stop it. By the way: The anti-corruption campaign was very necessary. It was completely rotten. It was a urgent step to clean up this huge mess.

Angela Köckritz, Miao Zhang: „Kein Grund zu weinen“ / 没有理由去哭 / “There’s no point crying” (Zeit)

Der chinesische Künstler Ai Weiwei hat seine Regierung stets stark kritisiert. Jetzt klingt er plötzlich anders.

Ian Johnson: ‘I Try to Talk Less’: A Conversation with Ai Weiwei and Liao Yiwu (New York Review of Books)

In late July, Chinese authorities renewed travel privileges for conceptual artist and political activist Ai Weiwei, ending a five-year prohibition following his arrest in 2011. He promptly flew to Munich and then Berlin, where he has accepted a three-year guest professorship at the city’s University of the Arts.
After arriving in Germany, Ai gave two interviews that aroused some controversy, telling the Süddeutsche Zeitung and Die Zeit that repression in China is bad but not as bad as in the past—defensible positions, especially if comparing today’s China to the Cultural Revolution or the period immediately after the 1989 Tiananmen massacre, but still surprising to some who had come to expect extremely pointed and uncompromising statements from Ai.

中国国际航空访问伦敦提示引发愤怒反应(BBC)

中国国际航空公司(Air China)警告旅客在访问伦敦“有些印巴聚集区和黑人聚集区”时要多加小心,在伦敦引起轩然大波。
这家航空公司在自己的空中月刊《中国之翼》中提示,“到伦敦旅行很安全,但有些印巴聚集区和黑人聚集区相对较乱。夜晚最好不要单独出行,女士应该尽量结伴而行。”

Matthew Weaver: Air China magazine condemned over ‚racist‘ guide to London (Guardian)

MPs have urged China’s UK ambassador to intervene in a row over racist comments reportedly issued by a Chinese airline about ethnic minority areas of London.
An image of text from an inflight Air China magazine posted on social media prompted outrage after it warned passengers that “precautions are needed when entering areas mainly populated by Indians, Pakistanis and black people”.

Korea | Inselstreit
Jun 27th, 2016 by Gao

Johnny Erling: Nordkorea: Kim provoziert mit Doppelraketentest

Nordkoreas Machthaber Kim Jong-un schlug zum richtigen Zeitpunkt gleich doppelt zu. Den UN-Sanktionen zum Trotz forderte er wieder einmal alle Welt heraus – mit zwei Raketentests kurz hintereinander, und das, obwohl die Vereinten Nationen solche Tests seinem Land verboten haben. … Kim befahl den ersten Test nach Angaben der südkoreanischen Nachrichtenagentur Yonhap Mittwochfrüh um 5.58 Uhr. Er ließ eine Mittelstreckenrakete vom Typ Musudan von der Ostküste Nordkoreas abschießen. US- und südkoreanisches Militär sehen in ihr eine potenzielle Trägerwaffe, die künftig mit einem Atomsprengkopf bestückt werden könnte. Mit einer Reichweite von 3000 bis 4000 Kilometern erreicht sie angeblich jeden Punkt in Japan und bedroht auch US-Stellungen auf Guam und in Alaska. …
Südkoreas Verteidigungsbehörden nannten den Test „misslungen“. Das Geschoß sei 150 Kilometer vom Start entfernt ins Meer gestürzt. Seit April ist es der inzwischen fünfte Fehlschlag in Folge. Doch um 8.05 Uhr zündete Nordkorea eine zweite Musudan. Sie soll laut Yonhap rund 400 Kilometer weit gekommen sein.

Justin McCurry: North Korea: UN security council ‚to meet‘ after missile tests (Guardian)

The missiles are usually test-fired at a flatter angle to maximise their range, according to Jeffrey Lewis at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies in California. “That suggests the missile worked perfectly,” he said. “Had it been fired at its normal angle, it would have flown to its full range.”…
It was not immediately clear whether Pyongyang considered the second Musudan launch a success or failure, or how the flight ended.

Pepe Escobar: Beijing goes mobile in the South China Sea (RT)

Not a day goes by without some sort of turmoil in the South China Sea. Let’s cut to the chase: war is not about to break out.

Scenarios of the Coming Crisis: A Response to Aufheben’s “The Crisis: Afterword” (Chuang)

In China, official politics is a game of arcane signals. Predicting tectonic shifts in policy requires that one read the seismic shudders buried beneath terse statements issued by poker-faced officials. Slight changes in terminology may hint at sliding allegiances or new waves of repression. The most significant signals, however, take the form of interviews with anonymous oracles—almost always an “authoritative person”—their words propagated by the state’s highest media organs without attribution. The more such oracles speak, the greater the magnitude of the coming “intervention.” Such proclamations also often signal internal disagreements within the seemingly monolithic Chinese Communist Party (CCP). With the slowing of economic growth, such disagreements have been exacerbated, as the top leadership debates the future of the economic reforms that have led China into a commanding role within global circuits of capital accumulation.

Qiao Long, Wong Lok-to, Luisetta Mudie: Chinese Blogger Who Compiled Protest Data Missing, Believed Detained (Radio Free Asia)

Arbeiterbewegung | Xinjiang | Verschuldung | Yanhuang Chunqiu | Polizeigewalt
Mai 30th, 2015 by Gao

Five years on, Nanhai Honda workers want more from their trade union (China Labour Bulletin)

Five years ago, on 17 May 2010, more than a thousand workers at the Nanhai Honda automotive components plant in Foshan walked off the job, initiating a high-profile, ground-breaking strike that came to symbolize the rise of the workers’ movement in China.
The strike secured the workers a 35 percent (500 yuan per month) pay increase plus the promise of more effective union representation after the official trade union was humiliated in its attempts to get the strikers back to work.
This week, China Labour Bulletin returned to Foshan and talked to some of the strike veterans about what has changed over the last five years and what still needs to be done.

Top China official’s criticism of labour policy sparks controversy (South China Morning Post)

In a speech to students of Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management on April 24, Finance Minister Lou Jiwei said China had a 50 per cent chance of sliding into the middle-income trap within the next five to 10 years when its annual gross domestic product growth slows to 5 per cent.
The middle-income trap refers to a situation where a country that has achieved stable growth becomes stuck at that level.
Comprehensive reforms were desperately needed to raise the urban labour supply in order to avoid falling into the trap and to ensure an annual 6.5 to 7 per cent GDP growth in the next few years, Lou said …
China’s labour contract law was flawed as it „reduced the labour market’s liquidity and flexibility“ by not allowing bosses to fire their workers, he said…
„That’s why many investors chose to leave China,“ Lou said.
In response, contributor Huang He wrote on Ground Breaking, a website focused on China’s disadvantaged group: „I understand his point is to meet the demand of capital increment by sacrificing workers‘ interests.
„[But] such a solution leaves Chinese labourers mired in low income and benefits capitalists in developed countries [instead].“
Lou also said China should cut farmers‘ subsidies, liberalise rural labour from farmlands, and improve its residence registration system so urban areas could have bigger labour populations.

Eset Sulaiman: Passports in Xinjiang’s Ili To Be Handed Into Police Stations: China (Radio Free Asia)
Emma Graham-Harrison: Chinese police order Yining residents to hand in passports in latest crackdown (Guardian)

A district of 5 million people in China’s restive far west has demanded that residents hand in their passports to the police for indefinite safekeeping, the latest government crackdown in an area where Beijing has declared a “people’s war” on violent separatists.
A notice posted in Yining city, nearly 2,000 miles west of Beijing and near the country’s border with Kazakhstan, said all passports should be surrendered by 15 May.
“Those who do not hand in their passports on time will be reported to the entry and exit bureau and, according to the relevant regulations, their passports will be cancelled,” the memo from a local police station said.

Fast wörtlich derselbe Bericht:
Edward Wong: Chinese Police Order Residents in a Xinjiang Prefecture to Turn In Passports (New York Times)

Enda Curran, Tu Lianting: China Has a Massive Debt Problem (Bloomberg)

Johnny Erling: Chinas mutigstes Reformmagazin steht vor dem Aus (Standard)

Chinas Führung will die einzige politische Reformzeitschrift des Landes zum Schweigen bringen, die sich traute, die Verbrechen Maos aufzudecken, und die KP-Diktatur zur Verfassungsherrschaft umwandeln möchte. Die „Yanhuang Chunqiu“ (China in allen Jahreszeiten) konnte sich ihrer Gleichschaltung 24 Jahre lang entziehen, weil ihre Autoren selbst einst allerhöchste Parteifunktionäre, Politiker oder bekannte Intellektuelle waren, die sich zu Radikalreformern gewandelt hatten. Peking hat die Juni-Nummer nun unter Vorzensur gestellt.

AP: Chinese policeman guns down unarmed traveller in front of his three children and elderly mother (South China Morning Post)

Railway police said the officer pulled the trigger after Xu Chunhe, 45, attacked him and tried to seize his gun on May 2.
But a private video clip circulating online shows the policeman using a long stick to beat Xu, who tried to dodge the blows and pull the stick away from the policeman. Local authorities have refused to release the full surveillance footage of the shooting…
Xu grew upset when he and his family were barred from boarding the train.
Impoverished and ill, Xu was travelling to Beijing to seek government assistance for his elderly mother and three children, which would have drawn unwelcome scrutiny on the local government.

Rüstungsbudget
Mrz 4th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong, Chris Buckley: China’s Military Budget Increasing 10% for 2015, Official Says (New York Times)

The Chinese military budget for 2015 will be about 10 percent bigger than last year’s, a senior Chinese official said on Wednesday, meaning that such spending is growing at a pace faster than the overall growth rate of the Chinese economy…
A 10 percent increase would put the 2015 military budget around $145 billion, making China the world’s second-largest military spender, though still far behind the United States, which spends more on its armed forces than the next eight countries combined.

Wettlauf mit den USA: China rüstet trotz Wachstumsschwäche kräftig auf (Spiegel)
APA: Chinas Rüstungsboom macht Nachbarn Sorge (Standard)

Der Wirtschaftsboom und die Sorge über die Übermacht des Westens haben Chinas Waffenausgaben in den vergangenen zehn Jahren in die Höhe schnellen lassen. Zwischen 2004 und 2013 sind die Ausgaben in der Volksrepublik nach Schätzungen um 170 Prozent gestiegen. Das lässt bei seinen Nachbarn die Alarmglocken schrillen.

Yang Fan, Ho Shan: Generals probed in Xi’s graft purge (Asia Times / Radio Free Asia)

The ruling Chinese Communist Party is investigating 14 generals for corruption as a nationwide anti-graft campaign widens to encompass the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), official media reported on Monday.
Among those under investigation is navy Rear Adm. Guo Zhenggang, son of a former vice-chairman of the party’s Central Military Commission (CMC), which commands the armed forces headed by President Xi Jinping, the country’s defense ministry said in a statement.

Sozialversicherungssystem | Mao Zedong | Long Baorong | Propaganda
Feb 14th, 2015 by Gao

China’s social security system (China Labour Bulletin)

The problems in China’s social security system can be traced back to two key events: The break-up of the state-run economy, which had provided urban workers with an “iron rice bowl” (employment, housing, healthcare and pension), and the introduction of the one-child policy in the 1980s, which meant that parents could no longer rely on a large extended family to look after them in their old age. In other words, as the economy developed and liberalized in the 1990s and 2000s, both the state and social structures that had supported workers in their old age, ill-health and during times of economic hardship gradually vanished, leaving a huge vacuum to fill.
The Chinese government sought to create a new social security system based on individual employment contracts that would make employers, rather than the state, primarily responsible for contributions to pensions, unemployment, medical, work-related injury and maternity insurance. In addition, the government established a housing fund designed to help employees, who no longer had housing provided for them, buy their own home…
After China embarked on its much vaunted economic reform and development program, the government gradually abdicated its authority in labour relations to business interests. As the private sector expanded, employers could unilaterally and arbitrarily determine the pay and working conditions of their employees, keeping wages low and benefits largely non-existent. The national government sought to protect the interests of workers by implementing legislation, such as the 1994 Labour Law and 2008 Labour Contract Law, however local governments either could not or would not enforce the law in the workplace.
Under these circumstances, creating a system where employers are primarily responsible for their employees’ social security was doomed to failure. Employers could often simply ignore their legal obligations and continue with business as usual, often with official connivance…
The failure of the Chinese government to enforce the law and create a social security system that covers everyone has not only disadvantaged China’s workers, it has severely hampered the government’s own ability to push ahead with and accomplish other important policy goals.

Rebecca E. Karl, Michael Schoenhals, Andrew J. Nathan, Richard Bernstein, Ho-Fung Hung, Sebastian Heilmann: Is Mao Still Dead? (ChinaFile)

It has long been standard operating procedure for China’s leaders to pay tribute to Mao. Even as the People’s Republic he wrought has embraced capitalist behavior with ever more heated ardor, the party he founded has remained firmly in power and his portrait has stared out over Tiananmen Square toward the squat building where his body reposes peacefully at the heart of a country he would scarcely recognize. But since Xi Jinping’s arrival at the helm, Mao’s words have seemed to reverberate more loudly. From the rejection of liberalism that colors the internal Party directive known as Document 9, to Education Minister Yuan Guiren’s recent speech demanding an “ideological campaign,” to Xi’s own speeches which seem to reference Mao and Marx far more often than his predecessors’, Chinese politics under Xi seem to have taken a hard ideological turn. How significant is this phenomenon and what does it mean? Is Mao still dead?

Edward Wong: China Sentences 27 Linked to Official Who Reported Graft (New York Times, auch via Google News)

A court in southern China has sentenced to prison 27 family members and supporters of a former official, now dead, who had sought to expose local corruption, a lawyer for one of them said Thursday.
The large number of people sentenced in a single trial for what their advocates have said were political rather than criminal activities was unusual. All were members of the Miao ethnic group, more commonly known in the West as the Hmong.
The former official, Long Baorong, of Fenghuang County in Hunan Province, was detained by Communist Party investigators in 2010 after he raised questions about the local government. In 2011, a court sentenced him to four or five years in prison for fraud and embezzlement, but he was unexpectedly released in 2012. He died shortly afterward, according to the lawyer, Ma Gangquan.

Luisetta Mudie: China Jails Ethnic Miao Leader’s Relatives, Supporters For ‚Triad‘ Activities (Radio Free Asia)

《网信精神》 (YouTube)

网络强国 网在哪光荣梦想在哪
网络强国 从遥远的宇宙到思念的家
网络强国 告诉世界中国梦在崛起大中华
网络强国 一个我在世界代表着国家

Josh Chin, Chun Han Wong: China’s Internet Censors Now Have Their Own Theme Song, And It Is Glorious (Wall Street Journal)
Und im wilden Nordwesten:
新疆喀什市《小苹果》广场舞大赛第一季全记录(天山网)
Rachel Lu: ‘De-radicalizing’ Xinjiang, One Bad Pop Song at a Time (Foreign Policy)

Xīnjiāng | Zhōu Yǒngkāng | Microsoft
Jul 31st, 2014 by Gao

Erneuter Terroranschlag in Xinjiang (Radio China International)

Ein gewaltiger Terroranschlag hat sich am Montag frühmorgens im Uigurischen Autonomen Gebiet Xinjiang ereignet. Dutzende von Zivilisten wurden getötet oder verletzt, Dutzende von Unruhestiftern wurden von der Polizei geschossen.
Wie die Polizei in Xinjiang mitteilte, eine Gruppe von Unruhestiftern hatten mit Messern und Äxten die Regierung und die Polizeistation im Gemeinde Elixku im Kreis Yarkant (Shache Zhen) angegriffen. Manche von ihnen fluchten nach dem Gemeinde Huangdi. Dutzende von unschuldigen Menschen wurden dabei getötet oder verletzt, 31 Autos zerstört oder verbrannt.

Dutzende Tote bei Anschlag in Chinas Unruheprovinz (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

Bei einer Messerattacke in der chinesischen Unruheprovinz Xinjiang sind nach Angaben staatlicher Medien zahlreiche Menschen getötet und verletzt worden. Die staatliche Nachrichtenagentur Xinhua meldete am Dienstag unter Berufung auf Angaben der örtlichen Polizei, dutzende Menschen seien am Vortag Opfer des Angriffs geworden. Demnach attackierte eine mit Messern bewaffnete Gruppe am Montag im Bezirk Shache ein Polizeirevier und andere Räumlichkeiten von Behörden.

Emily Rauhala: Dozens Dead or Injured in Xinjiang ‘Terror,’ but Facts Are Few and Far Between (Time)
Shohret Hoshur, Eset Sulaiman, Yang Fan: Dozens of Uyghurs Shot Dead in Riots in Xinjiang’s Yarkand County (Radio Free Asia)

Chinese police in northwestern China’s troubled Xinjiang region have shot dead dozens of knife and axe-wielding ethnic minority Uyghur Muslims who went on a rampage, apparently angry over restrictions during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan and the cold-blooded killing of a family of five, officials said.

China Xinjiang: Attack ‚kills or injures dozens‘ (BBC)
Chinese police shoot dozens of attackers dead in Xinjiang region (Guardian)
Tania Branigan: Chinese police seize matchboxes in Xinjiang security crackdown (Guardian)
AFP/Reuters: Xinjiang: Streichhölzer im Kampf gegen Terror beschlagnahmt (Presse)
Joshua Lipes: Religious Curbs in Xinjiang ‘Increases Potential’ For Violent Extremism (Radio Free Asia)
Xinjiang: Tight security after deadly violence (BBC)

Michael Martina, Ben Blanchard: More violence in China’s Xinjiang, prominent academic indicted (Reuters)

China formally indicted a prominent ethnic Uighur professor for separatism on Wednesday, as security forces flooded into the far western region of Xinjiang amid more reports of violence following what the government called a terrorist attack.
Police in Beijing in January detained Ilham Tohti, a well-known economist who has championed the rights of the Muslim Uighur community, who come from Xinjiang.

Philip Wen: China charges Uighur scholar Ilham Tohti with working for separatism (Sydney Morning Herald)

China has formally indicted Uighur scholar and rights advocate Ilham Tohti on charges of separatism – a crime that carries a potential death sentence – even as a fresh outbreak of deadly violence wracked the turbulent far-western region of Xinjiang.

Shohret Hoshur: Imam of Grand Kashgar Mosque Murdered in Xinjiang Violence (Radio Free Asia)

The head of the largest mosque in China who has been highly critical of violence by ethnic minority Muslim Uyghurs in the troubled Xinjiang region has been stabbed to death, according to witnesses and local officials.
Jume Tahir [Jümǝ Taⱨir], the Uyghur imam of the Id Kah mosque in the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar in China’s western Xinjiang region, was found in a pool of blood outside the prayer house on Wednesday morning.

Katie Nelson: Conflicting details about Xinjiang attacks emerge, imam of China’s biggest mosque reportedly killed (Shanghaiist)
Shannon Tiezzi: Dozens Dead in Latest Xinjiang Violence (Diplomat)
Shohret Hohshur: Wife of Party Official Killed in Xinjiang ‘Revenge Attack’ (Radio Free Asia)

Tania Branigan: China begins corruption inquiry into former security chief Zhou Yongkang (Guardian)
Jonathan Kaiman: Zhou Yongkang: oil boss who became China’s third most powerful man (Guardian)

DPA: Chinas Wettbewerbshüter ermitteln gegen Microsoft (Heise)
AFP: Microsoft faces monopoly investigation in China (Guardian)

Aktuelle Streiks nach Region
Apr 23rd, 2014 by Gao

Folgende Zusammenstellung stammt von „Husunzi“.

Bei Yue Yuen in Dongguan streiken noch immer 10.000–50.000 von 40.000–60.000 Arbeiter_innen:
China sports shoe factory halts production as strike escalates (Financial Times)
东莞裕元罢工诗抄:运动正是高峰!(新生代)

Bei Yue Yuen in Jiangxi streiken 2.000 Arbeiter_innen in Solidarität mit ihren Kolleg_innen in Dongguan:
Jonathan Kaiman: Strike spreads at Chinese supplier to Adidas and Nike (Guardian)

In Henan streiken seit über zwei Wochen tausende Lehrer_innen:
Jiang Pei, Lin Jing, Luisetta Mudie: Henan Teachers Vow to Keep Marching Over Pay Demands (Radio Free Asia)

In Shenzhen streiken seit dem 16. April tausende Busfahrer_innen:
Thousands of bus company workers strike in Shenzhen (China Labour Bulletin)
深圳东部公交千人罢工抗议低待遇 警察强行驱散(新生代)

In Beijing streiken tausend Arbeiter_innen eines Motorenwerkes:
维灵、何山:北京千人罢工争补偿 (Radio Free Asia)

In Foshan streiken seit zwei Tagen Straßenkehrer_innen:
冯雷亮、曾群善:佛山百名环卫工罢工要求涨薪千元 每月收入所剩无几(新生代)

In Dongguan begannen Taxifahrer_innen am 18. April einen Streik:
Dongguan cabbies launch strike amid business slowdown (South China Morning Post)

Außerdem gibt es u.a. Proteste in Maoming gegen den Bau einer Chemiefabrik und Proteste in Wenzhou gegen Übergriffe vonseiten des Städtischen Ordnungsdienstes (城管).

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