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Streiks | Protest in Shanghai | Staatsbetriebe | Hongkong
Jul 6th, 2015 by Gao

Tensions rise as China’s taxi drivers and factory workers strike in record numbers (China Labour Bulletin)

China’s taxi drivers and factory workers took the lead in staging strikes and protests across the country in the second quarter of 2015 as threats to their livelihood continued to mount. Construction workers continued their protests over wage arrears but numbers were down slightly compared with earlier in the year.
Overall, China Labour Bulletin’s Strike Map recorded 568 strikes and worker protests in the second quarter, bringing the total for this year to around 1,218 incidents, not far off the total for the whole of 2014, which stood at 1,379.

Jennifer Baker: Growing Air Pollution Protest in Shanghai (Revolution News)

Anti Pollution protests against the construction of a new PX plant continue to grow in the Shanghai suburb of Jinshui. The protest that began on Monday doubled in size Thursday night when approximately 5000 people filled the streets to re-affirm their opposition.

Mirjam Meissner, Lea Shih, Luisa Kinzius, Sandra Heep: Wie Phönix aus der Asche: Reformen sollen Chinas Staatsunternehmen den Rücken stärken (Mercator Institute for China Studies)

Chinesische Staatsunternehmen sind längst Teil der sozialistischen Vergangenheit, mag manch einer denken. Tatsächlich gab es bereits in den 1990er Jahren eine erste große Privatisierungswelle. Doch noch immer spielen Staatsbetriebe eine zentrale Rolle in Chinas Wirtschaftsgeschehen. Allerdings besteht dringender Reformbedarf, denn viele Staatsunternehmen sind nicht nur hoch verschuldet, sondern trotz großzügiger Subventionen auch deutlich weniger profitabel als Chinas Privatunternehmen.

Surya Deva: After the Veto: Umbrella Movement 2.0? (Hong Kong Free Press)

Despite all the hype, the Hong Kong’s government’s “Make It Happen” campaign to introduce pseudo universal suffrage in Hong Kong fell flat on 18 June 2015. The hard stance taken by both Beijing and the Hong Kong government meant that not even one pan-democrat legislator wavered from their pledge to veto the political reform package for the Chief Executive election in 2017. Rather the voting drama that unfolded in the Legislative Council (LegCo) exposed the political immaturity of pro-establishment LegCo members.

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