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Militärstützpunkt in Pakistan?
Jun 12th, 2017 by Gao

Reuters: Pentagon report singles out Pakistan as home of future Chinese military base (Dawn)

A Pentagon report released on Tuesday singled out Pakistan as a possible location for a future Chinese military base, as it forecast that Beijing would likely build more bases overseas after establishing a facility in the African nation of Djibouti.
The prediction came in a 97-page annual report to Congress that saw advances throughout the Chinese military in 2016, funded by robust defence spending that the Pentagon estimated exceeded $180 billion. That is higher than China’s official defence budget figure of $140.4 billion…
Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Hua Chunying declined to comment on possible overseas bases but said that China and Pakistan were close friends that conduct „mutually beneficial cooperation“ in a variety of fields.
While talking about the country’s operating overseas defence projects, Hua said the bases were there to improve navigation safety and assistance for fishermen as well as „to safeguard China’s independent sovereignty and territorial integrity. It is a legitimate right of a sovereign state.”

Neil Connor: China likely to set up military base in Pakistan – Pentagon (Telegraph)

China could build a new base in Pakistan as part of a global expansion of its military facilities, a US report says.
The report from the Pentagon predicts China will expand its military prowess after the construction of its first overseas naval base in Djibouti, a strategic location at the southern entrance to the Red Sea on the route to the Suez Canal.

Benjamin Haas: China to set up military bases in Pakistan – Pentagon report (Guardian)

China is set to expand its military capabilities across the globe, with new overseas bases in countries like Pakistan as the world’s largest army seeks an increased role in defending China’s interest abroad, a report by the Pentagon has said…
“China most likely will seek to establish additional military bases in countries with which it has a longstanding friendly relationship and similar strategic interests, such as Pakistan,” the report said.
“This initiative, along with regular naval vessel visits to foreign ports, both reflects and amplifies China’s growing influence, extending the reach of its armed forces.”
Last year China began building its first overseas base in the African nation of Djibouti, already home to Camp Lemonnier, a large US instillation responsible for counter terrorism operations in the Persian Gulf and east and north Africa.

Franz-Stefan Gady: Chinese Warships visit Pakistan (Diplomat)
Никита Коваленко: Сближение Китая и Пакистана добавит проблем России (Взгляд)

Китай и Пакистан вывели свое партнерство на новый уровень, явно дав понять это яркими символическими шагами, одним из которых стал первый совместный военный парад. Это событие в столь далеком, казалось бы, регионе может стать серьезным вызовом и для России. Дело в том, что сближение Пекина и Исламабада крайне нервирует одну из самых дружественных Москве стран – Индию.

F. M. Shakil: US alarm at possible Chinese base in Pakistan ignores context (Asia Times)

The Pentagon’s assessment this week that Pakistan may be set to host a Chinese military base is likely to have caused more of a commotion in New Delhi than in Islamabad. The fact is that Pakistan has provided strategic defense facilities to China for some time; indeed, such provision is key to the US$57 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

Vinay Kaura: Understanding India’s response to China’s Belt and Road (Asia Times)

New Delhi decided to skip the much-publicized Belt and Road Forum in Beijing, framing the One Belt, One Road (OBOR) initiative as a bad deal that undermines India’s core interests. Is this position in conflict with India’s simultaneous aspirations for economic cooperation and peaceful co-existence with China?

Doug Tsuruoka: China’s Obor could keep African economies moving (Asia Times)

China’s bold One Belt One Road (Obor) initiative to forge an integrated economic zone that stretches from Central Asia to Europe has an African component that could energize nations such as Nigeria and Tanzania at a time when they need a lift. Growth in sub-Saharan Africa hit its lowest level in two decades last year due to unstable oil prices, inflation and political volatility…
Obor has a firm beachhead in Africa. China surpassed the US as Africa’s largest trading partner in 2009…

Obama in Hangzhou
Sep 6th, 2016 by Gao

Pepe Escobar: The G20 Meets in Tech Hub Hangzhou, China, At an Extremely Tense Geopolitical [something] (CounterPunch)

[A]t the heart of the G20 we will have the two projects which are competing head on to geopolitically shape the young 21st century.
China has proposed OBOR; a pan-Eurasian connectivity spectacular designed to configure a hypermarket at least 10 times the size of the US market within the next two decades.
The US hyperpower – not the Atlanticist West, because Europe is mired in fear and stagnation — “proposes” the current neocon/neoliberalcon status quo; the usual Divide and Rule tactics; and the primacy of fear, enshrined in the Pentagon array of “threats” that must be fought, from Russia and China to Iran. The geopolitical rumble in the background high-tech jungle is all about the “containment” of top G20 members Russia and China…
Deng Xiaoping’s maxim – “never take the lead, never reveal your true potential, never overstretch your abilities” – now belongs to the past. At the G20 China once again is announcing it is taking the lead. And not only taking the lead – but also planning to overstretch its abilities to make the hyper-ambitious OBOR Eurasia integration masterplan work. Call it a monster PR exercise or a soft power win-win; the fact that humanitarian imperialism as embodied by the Pentagon considers China a major “threat” is all the Global South – and the G20 for that matter — needs to know.

Full Text: Chinese Outcome List of the Meeting Between the Chinese and US Presidents in Hangzhou (Xinhua)
Tom Phillips: Barack Obama ‚deliberately snubbed‘ by Chinese in chaotic arrival at G20 (Guardian)

China’s leaders have been accused of delivering a calculated diplomatic snub to Barack Obama after the US president was not provided with a staircase to leave his plane during his chaotic arrival in Hangzhou before the start of the G20.

Roberta Rampton, Michael Martina: Row on tarmac an awkward G20 start for U.S., China (Reuters)

A Chinese official confronted U.S. President Barack Obama’s national security adviser on the tarmac on Saturday prompting the Secret Service to intervene, an unusual altercation as China implements strict controls ahead of a big summit.

Mark Landler: Confrontations Flare as Obama’s Traveling Party Reaches China (New York Times)

As the reporters who traveled to the Group of 20 summit meeting with President Obama from Hawaii piled out and walked under the wing to record his arrival, we were abruptly met by a line of bright blue tape, held taut by security guards. In six years of covering the White House, I had never seen a foreign host prevent the news media from watching Mr. Obama disembark.
When a White House staff member protested to a Chinese security official that this was not normal protocol, the official shouted, “This is our country.”
In another departure from protocol, there was no rolling staircase for Mr. Obama to descend in view of the television cameras. Instead, he emerged from a door in the belly of the plane that he usually uses only on high-security trips, like those to Afghanistan…
At the West Lake State House, where Mr. Obama met President Xi Jinping, White House aides, protocol officers and Secret Service agents got into a series of shouting matches over how many Americans should be allowed into the building before Mr. Obama’s arrival.

Tom Phillips: Barack Obama ‚deliberately snubbed‘ by Chinese in chaotic arrival at G20 (Guardian)
Matthias Müller: Gespannte Atmosphäre zwischen China und den USA (Neue Zürcher Zeitung)
Zhou Xin, Nectar Gan: G20 ‘staircase snub’ for Obama was United States’ decision, reveals Chinese official (South China Morning Post)

It was Washington’s decision to have US President Barack Obama disembark from his plane through a small bare metal stairway instead of the usual rolling red-carpet staircase that state leaders get, a Chinese foreign ministry official has revealed…
“China provides a rolling staircase for every arriving state leader, but the US side complained that the driver doesn’t speak English and can’t understand security instructions from the United States; so China proposed that we could assign a translator to sit beside the driver, but the US side turned down the proposal and insisted that they didn’t need the staircase provided by the airport,” the official told the South China Morning Post on Sunday.

Sun Xiaobo: China chides media’s hype of G20 spat (Global Times)

The skirmishes between Chinese and US officials when US President Barack Obama arrived in Hangzhou for the G20 summit on Saturday have been exaggerated by some US officials and attracted undue attention from Western media outlets, dismaying Chinese netizens and observers who viewed the hype as fresh evidence of the arrogance of some in the West.

Tom Phillips: Ghost town: how China emptied Hangzhou to guarantee ‚perfect‘ G20 (Guardian)

Thomas C. Mountain: The CIA’s ‚Dirty War‘ in South Sudan (TeleSur)

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) of the USA is funding a dirty war in South Sudan. The war in South Sudan is little different than the wars the CIA funded in Angola and Mozambique, to name two of the most infamous.
It is in the “national interests” of the USA to deny China access to African energy resources and the Sudanese oil fields are the only Chinese owned and operated in Africa. It’s that simple – the war in South Sudan is about denying China access to Africa’s oil.

Murtaza Hussain: How Obama’s Asia pivog nudged China toward Pakistan but helped aggravate India (Intercept)

Haager Inselstreit-Urteil
Jul 12th, 2016 by Gao

Bill Gertz: US, China wage legal warfare over control of the South China Sea (Asia Times)

The United States is stealing a page from China’s strategic playbook in using international law as a means to counter expansive maritime claims in the South China Sea.
The three-year old case between China and the Philippines over the South China Sea at the United Nations Permanent Court of Arbitration Tribunal in The Hague will end Tuesday when the court’s ruling is announced.
US officials say the ruling is expected to favor the Philippines in the maritime dispute and provide a solid basis in traditional international law for pushing back against China’s claims.

Tom Phillips: Beijing defiant ahead of court ruling on its claims in South China Sea (Guardian)

China has refused to recognise the five-judge court’s authority and on Tuesday morning the country’s Communist party-controlled press lashed out at what it claimed was a United States-sponsored conspiracy to stifle its rise.

Law-abusing tribunal issues ill-founded award on South China Sea arbitration (Xinhua)

The tribunal handling the South China Sea arbitration case unilaterally initiated by the former Philippine government issued its final award on Tuesday, amid a global chorus that as the panel has no jurisdiction, its decision is naturally null and void.

Unlawful arbitration cannot negate China’s sovereignty over South China Sea (People’s Daily / Global Times)
Arbitration award more shameless than worst prediction (Global Times)
China’s reaction to arbitration depends on provocation (Global Times)

The award of the South China Sea arbitration will be issued at 5 pm Beijing time Tuesday. The US and Japan have claimed that relevant countries, including China, should comply with the arbitration result. They stand in sharp confrontation with China, which has announced that the award would be „nothing but a piece of paper.“ Whether the arbitration will lead to a severe geopolitical crisis has come under the global spotlight.

Tom Phillips, Oliver Holmes, Owen Bowcott: Philippines wins South China Sea case against China (Guardian)

China has lost a key international legal case over strategic reefs and atolls that it claims would give it control over disputed waters of the South China Sea.
The judgment by an international tribunal in The Hague is overwhelmingly in favour of claims by the Philippines and will increase global diplomatic pressure on Beijing to scale back military expansion in the sensitive area.
By depriving certain outcrops – some of which are exposed only at low tide – of territorial-generating status, the ruling effectively punches holes in China’s all-encompassing “nine-dash” demarcation line that stretches deep into the South China Sea. It declares large areas of the sea to be neutral international waters.

Oliver Holmes, Tom Phillips: South China Sea dispute: what you need to know about The Hague court ruling (Guardian)
What you need to know about The Hague arbitration, the China-Philippines sea dispute (Global Times)

The U-shaped, nine-dash line encircling most of the South China Sea is the core of China’s claim. It was first published on a map drawn by the Kuomintang’s Republic of China government in 1947 and then inherited by the People’s Republic of China in 1949.
China’s sovereignty over the South China Sea was never officially disputed until the 1960s.

Zhao Minghao: South China Sea chaos would only add to global woes (Global Times)
Statement of the Government of the People‘ s Republic of China on China’s Territorial Sovereignty and Maritime Rights and Interests in the South China Sea (Xinhua)
Statement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China on the Award of 12 July 2016 of the Arbitral Tribunal in the South China Sea Arbitration Established at the Request of the Republic of the Philippines (Xinhua)
Thomas Escritt, Ben Blanchard: Tribunal says China has no ‘historic’ title over South China Sea (Asia Times)
Taiping, an island not rock, says Taiwan; Philippines, Vietnam hail sea ruling (Asia Times)

While the Philippines and Vietnam welcomed the international tribunal’s ruling on South China Sea, Taiwan rejected the court’s view that defined a Taiwan-controlled island in the waters as a “rock.”

Liu Zhen: Questions of neutrality: China takes aim at judges in South China Sea case (South China Morning Post)

China confident of ability to deal with provocation in South China Sea, says Defense Ministry spokesperson (Global Times)
Lies of Philippines‘ Aquino administration on South China Sea (Xinhua)
Why will China never respect U.S. over South China Sea? (Xinhua)

Shortly after UNCLOS was unveiled in 1982, then U.S. President Ronald Reagan refused to sign, claiming the convention undermined his country’s sovereignty.
In 1994, after UNCLOS was revised to take into consideration American worries about losing control of valuable underwater oil and natural-gas deposits, then U.S. President Bill Clinton signed an updated UNCLOS agreement, although not the entire treaty.

Li Kaisheng: Washington can’t steer Manila’s path (Global Times)
Liu Haiyang: Tribunal award could impair UNCLOS (Global Times)
Graham Allison: Of Course China, Like All Great Powers, Will Ignore an International Legal Verdict (Diplomat)
Wang Wen: Debunking 10 myths about China and the South China Sea (South China Morning Post)
Bill Hayton: China’s ‘Historic Rights’ in the South China Sea: Made in America? (Diplomat)

The current understanding of “historic rights” in the South China Sea in China can be traced back to a U.S. diplomat.

Bill Hayton: China’s South Sea claims were always about emotion, not history (National Interest)

The tribunal’s award is 501 pages long. I’m still reading it, but my favorite line so far comes in Paragraph 270, where the judges say, “The Tribunal is unable to identify any evidence that would suggest that China historically regulated or controlled fishing in the South China Sea, beyond the limits of the territorial sea.” This destroys the implicit misunderstanding at the heart of China’s attitude towards the region—that it, and only it, has been the sole user of the waters between its coast and those of its neighbors.
No one can deny that Chinese traders or fishing communities based along the coast of what is now China made extensive use of the sea. But so did traders and fishers from all the other countries around it. So did merchants from India, Persia, Arabia and Europe. The history of the South China Sea has always been a shared one. Muslim traders built a mosque in Guangzhou in the eighth century, Chinese shipwrights borrowed design ideas from Malay vessels, and the region grew rich on the profits of exchange. The chauvinism about China’s superior and exclusive claim to the sea only emerged in the dying years of the Qing Empire and the chaotic early years of the Republic of China.

Thomas Eder: „China hat Völkerrecht gebrochen“ (8MRD)
Richard Javad Heydarian: China may dispute South China Sea verdict, but it’s a huge setback (Guardian)
Pepe Escobar: Between a Rock and a Hard (South China) Place (CounterPunch)

Beijing is open for talks, as long as Manila sets the ruling aside. Jay Batongbacal, from the University of the Philippines, cuts to the heart of the issue: “Publicly stating that junking the arbitration is a condition for resuming negotiations gives no room for face-saving on either side.”

Alfred Gerstl: Recht oder Macht im Südchinesischen Meer (Standard)

Auch wenn in China die Wogen nach dem Schiedsspruch des Ständigen Schiedshofs hochgehen: Nun gibt es die Chance, den Konflikt unter dem Dach der Assoziation südostasiatischer Nationen zu lösen.

Nordwestpassage | Indien | Kulturrevolution
Jun 20th, 2016 by Gao

China sets its sights on the Northwest Passage as a potential trade boon (Guardian)

China is looking to exploit the Northwest Passage, the fabled shortcut from the Pacific to the Atlantic, according to state-run media, with the world’s biggest trader in goods publishing a shipping guide to the route.
The seaway north of Canada, which could offer a quicker journey from China to the US east coast than via the Panama Canal or Cape Horn, was sought by European explorers for centuries, including by the doomed Franklin expedition of 1845.
Even now it remains ice-bound for much of the year, but global warming and the retreat of Arctic sea ice are making it more accessible, and Beijing sees it as an opportunity to reshape global trade flows.
China’s maritime safety administration earlier this month published a 356-page, Chinese-language guide including nautical charts and descriptions of ice conditions for the Northwest Passage, said the China Daily newspaper, which is published by the government…
Canada regards the Northwest Passage as part of its internal waters, while some other countries consider it an international strait.
Beijing – which is embroiled in territorial disputes of its own in the South and East China Seas – on Wednesday declined to say where it stood on the issue.

Anna Sawerthal: Indien und China rüsten am Wasser auf (Standard)

Über 3.000 Kilometer fließt der Brahmaputra erst durch China, dann durch Indien. Seit Jahren liefern sich die Länder ein Staudamm-Wettbauen – auf Kosten der Umwelt

Chris Buckley: How the Cultural Revolution Sowed the Seeds of Dissent in China (New York Times)

Guobin Yang is a sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania best known for his research on the internet in China. But in his latest book, “The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China,’’ he turns back to examine the upheavals of the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution and the imprint they left on a generation of Chinese who became radicals and Red Guards in the name of Mao Zedong. The book explores the cultural background to the violence of the Cultural Revolution, and how those experiences nurtured dissenting ideas and the cultural experimentation that burst into flower after Mao’s death in 1976. In an interview, Mr. Yang explained how that happened.

Entlassungen | Milliardäre
Mrz 7th, 2016 by Gao

Kevin Yao, Meng Meng: China expects to lay off 1.8 million workers in coal, steel sectors (Reuters)

China said on Monday it expects to lay off 1.8 million workers in the coal and steel industries, or about 15 percent of the workforce, as part of efforts to reduce industrial overcapacity, but no timeframe was given.
It was the first time China has given figures that underline the magnitude of its task in dealing with slowing growth and bloated state enterprises.
Yin Weimin, the minister for human resources and social security, told a news conference that 1.3 million workers in the coal sector could lose jobs, plus 500,000 from the steel sector. China’s coal and steel sectors employ about 12 million workers, according to data published by the National Bureau of Statistics.
„This involves the resettlement of a total of 1.8 million workers. This task will be very difficult, but we are still very confident,“ Yin said.

China schrumpft Industrie und streicht Millionen Jobs (Standard)

China steht vor den größten Massenentlassungen seit zwei Jahrzehnten. Die Regierung will in der Industrie fünf bis sechs Millionen Arbeitsplätze streichen. …
Ende der 1990er-Jahre waren in einem Zeitraum von fünf Jahren 28 Millionen Jobs abgebaut worden. Die damalige Umstrukturierung verursachte Kosten in Höhe von 73,1 Milliarden Yuan (10,25 Mrd. Euro) für die soziale Abfederung. Erst am Montag hatte Arbeitsminister Yin Weimin erklärt, dass allein in der Kohle- und Stahlindustrie 1,8 Millionen Jobs wegfallen sollen.

七问供给侧结构性改革——权威人士谈当前经济怎么看怎么干(《人民日报》~新华社)

去年底召开的中央经济工作会议,对“十三五”开局之年的经济工作进行了全面部署,强调要着力推进供给侧结构性改革,推动经济持续健康发展。如何认真学习、深刻领会、正确贯彻中央经济工作会议精神,围绕推进供给侧结构性改革这条主线,做好新一年经济工作?近日,权威人士接受本报独家专访,对“供给侧结构性改革”作了解读和阐释。

Chris Buckley: Xi Jinping’s Remedy for China’s Economic Gloom Has Echoes of Reaganomics (New York Times)

With the world looking to China for assurance that it can manage its slowing economy and tumultuous stock market, President Xi Jinping has begun pushing a remedy that sounds less like Marx and Mao than Reagan and Thatcher.
Mr. Xi is calling his next big economic initiative “supply-side structural reform,” a deliberate echo of the nostrums of tax cuts and deregulation advocated by those conservative Western leaders in the 1980s.

Johnny Erling: 218 Milliardäre in Chinas Parlamenten (Standard)

Noch nie tummelten sich so viele Milliardäre unter den Volksvertretern. 117 Volkskongressabgeordnete sind im Hauptberuf schwerreiche Unternehmer, Konzernchefs oder Internetbetreiber. Weitere 101 Superreiche sitzen im Beraterparlament [Gemeint ist die Politische Konsultativkonferenz des Chinesischen Volkes, 政協].
Rupert Hoogewerf, Herausgeber der jährlich in Shanghai erscheinenden Hurun-Reichenlisten, hat sie nun auf seiner 2016 erschienen Weltliste zum Ranking von 2188 Dollar- Milliardären und einer weiteren Liste von 1877 chinesischen Superreichen erkannt. Am Samstag veröffentlichte er eine neue Ranking-Liste mit 218 der „reichsten Politiker Chinas 2016“, die in beiden Kammern des Parlaments sitzen. Mitglieder dieses exklusiven Klubs können nur Abgeordnete werden, die mindestens Firmen-, Aktien- oder Immobilienvermögen im Wert von mehr als zwei Milliarden Yuan (300 Millionen Euro) besitzen. Ein Jahre zuvor hatte der Brite 203 Abgeordnete im Volkskongress und im Beraterparlament als Milliardäre gezählt, darunter 106 superreiche Abgeordnete im NPC (3,6 Prozent aller Delegierten) und 97 im CPPCC (4,3 Prozent). Nun stieg der Anteil auf 3,9 und 4,5 Prozent. …
Insgesamt vermehrten die 117 Superreichen im Volkskongress 2015 ihr Vermögen im Durchschnitt um 20 Prozent, die 101 im Beraterparlament um zehn Prozent. Chinas Wirtschaftswachstum stieg dagegen nur um 6,9 Prozent. …
Die meisten darunter dürften sogar Mitglieder der Kommunistischen Partei sein, wie etwa der Wahaha-Getränkegigant Zong Qinghou aus Hangzhou. …
Seit 2001 umarmt die Partei pragmatisch den neuen Geldadel Chinas, solange er patriotisch gesinnt ist, seine Steuern zahlt und den Aufbau des Landes unterstützt. Nirgendwo werden Unternehmer so schnell zu Milliardären wie in China …
Auf der globalen Hoogewerf-Reichenliste sind unter den 2188 Dollar-Milliardären in 68 Ländern auf der ganzen Welt bereits 568 Chinesen.

潘奕燃:电视剧通则曝光 早恋婚外恋转世等不得出现(中国网~搜狐)

在前天举行的电视剧四大行业委员会的联合年会上,国家新闻出版广电总局电视剧司司长李京盛在谈到电视剧的生产制作规范时,提到了由中广联电视制片委员会和中国电视剧制作产业协会共同制定的《电视剧内容制作通则》。
  新出台的《电视剧内容制作通则》曝出,该通则详细规定了不能在电视剧中出现的具体内容,涉及同性恋、婚外情、未成年人早恋等。该通则对于电视剧制作单位和创作者有“指南”作用。

电视剧通则曝光 早恋同性恋转世不得出现(新浪)

《电视剧内容制作通则》曝出,该通则详细规定了不能在电视剧中出现的具体内容,涉及同性恋、婚外情、未成年人早恋等。

Hannah Ellis-Petersen: China bans depictions of gay people on television (Guardian)

The Chinese government has banned all depictions of gay people on television, as part of a cultural crackdown on “vulgar, immoral and unhealthy content”.
Chinese censors have released new regulations for content that “exaggerates the dark side of society” and now deem homosexuality, extramarital affairs, one night stands and underage relationships as illegal on screen.

Josh Horwitz, Zheping Huang: China’s new television rules ban homosexuality, drinking, and vengeance (Quartz)

In the past decade, Chinese society has embraced homosexuality more openly than many neighboring nations in Asia. But a new set of rules from a subdivision of SARFT, one of the main media censorship bodies, go in the other direction. If upheld, Chinese producers can no longer make television shows depicting “abnormal sexual relations or sexual behavior” including “homosexuality” or “perversion.”
That’s not all. The new rules also ban shows that depict smoking, drinking, adultery, sexual freedom or reincarnation, among many other activities.

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian: How China Won the War Against Western Media (Foreign Policy)

The one-two punch of censorship plus propaganda has discredited Western journalism in the eyes of many Chinese.

Ilaria Maria Sala: Second ‚missing‘ Hong Kong bookseller returns from China (Guardian)

Cheung Chi-ping arrives back home two days after authorities released his boss, Lui Por, but three publishers remain on the mainland.

Überproduktion | Inselstreit
Feb 29th, 2016 by Gao

The march of the zombies (Economist)
China’s surplus capacity in steelmaking, for example, is bigger than the entire steel production of Japan, America and Germany combined. Rhodium Group, a consulting firm, calculates that global steel production rose by 57% in the decade to 2014, with Chinese mills making up 91% of this increase. In industry after industry, from paper to ships to glass, the picture is the same: China now has far too much supply in the face of shrinking internal demand. Yet still the expansion continues: China’s aluminium-smelting capacity is set to rise by another tenth this year. According to Ying Wang of Fitch, a credit-rating agency, around two billion tonnes of gross new capacity in coal mining will open in China in the next two years.

Daniel Hurst, Oliver Holmes, Justin McCurry: Beijing places missile launchers on disputed South China Sea island (Guardian)

China has deployed surface-to-air missile launchers on an island in the South China Sea, satellite images appear to show, dramatically upping the stakes in a territorial dispute involving the US and its regional allies.
Tensions in the South China Sea, a vital shipping route, could rise after two batteries of eight missile launchers and a radar system were deployed to Woody Island in the past week, according to images taken by the private company ImageSat International.
The images were first published by Fox News. The Chinese foreign minister, Wang Yi, did not deny that missile launchers had been installed but said the reports were an attempt by certain western media to create news stories.

Daniel Hurst: Julie Bishop says missile launchers shouldn’t deter flights (Guardian)
Reuters: South China Sea: US may consider sending more destroyers to patrol islands (Guardian)
Shalailah Medhora: China expresses ‚dissatisfaction‘ at Australia’s defence white paper (Guardian)

China has expressed “concern and dissatisfaction” with Australia’s defence white paper, a multibillion-dollar framework for military acquisition and strategy over the coming decades that was released on Thursday.
The white paper noted “a number of points of friction”, including over China’s territorial ambitions in the South China Sea.

声援无名政治犯,海外发起“我是张海涛”运动 (Voice of America)
Appeal Begins of Harsh 19-Year Prison Term Given Xinjiang-based Activist Zhang Haitao (China Change)

Inselstreit
Jan 4th, 2016 by Gao

APA/AFP: China provoziert Vietnam mit Flug zu Spratly-Inseln (Presse)

Mit der Landung eines Flugzeugs auf den umstrittenen Spratly-Inseln im Südchinesischen Meer hat China den Konflikt mit Vietnam erneut angeheizt. Peking wies am späten Samstagabend Kritik aus Hanoi zurück, nachdem ein chinesisches Flugzeug auf einem Atoll der Inseln, dem Fiery Cross Reef, gelandet war. Laut chinesischem Außenministerium habe es sich lediglich um einen „zivilen Testflug“ gehandelt. Die Aktion habe innerhalb von chinesischem Territorium stattgefunden, hieß es weiter. China streitet mit den Ländern Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam und den Philippinen seit Jahren um die Spratly-Inseln. Dort werden große Erdöl- und Erdgasvorkommen vermutet. Vietnam hatte gegen die Landung des chinesischen Flugzeugs protestiert und erklärt, die Aktion beeinflusse „Frieden und Stabilität im Südchinesischen Meer“. China müsse diesen Schritt „umgehend beenden“ und dürfe derlei Aktionen „nicht wiederholen“.

Vietnam protests after China lands plane on disputed Spratly islands (Guardian)

Vietnam has formally accused China of violating its sovereignty by landing a plane on an airstrip Beijing has built on an artificial island in a contested part of the South China Sea.
Foreign ministry spokesman Le Hai Binh said the airfield had been “built illegally” on Fiery Cross Reef in the Spratly archipelago, in territory that was “part of Vietnam’s Spratlys”.
China’s foreign ministry rejected the complaint, saying that what was a test flight to the newly built airfield on the reef was a matter “completely within China’s sovereignty,” the Chinese state news agency Xinhua reported.
The United States said it was concerned that the flight had exacerbated tensions.
Washington has criticised China’s construction of artificial islands in the South China Sea and worries that Beijing plans to use them for military purposes, even though China says it has no hostile intent.

Ausführlicher Hintergrundartikel:
Alex Calvo: South China Sea arbitration: Beijing puts forward her own views – part one | part two (Center for International Maritime Security)

Foxconn | Liu Han | Hongkong | Xinjiang
Feb 11th, 2015 by Gao

Yi Xi: Four years later, still a graveyard of Chinese youth (libcom.org)

In 2014, on the eve of China’s national day celebrations, scenes recalling those of four years ago appeared in Chinese headlines. Foxconn became known to the world four years ago when thirteen of its young workers jumped to their deaths in quick succession. The death of young Foxconn worker and poet Xu Lizhi reminded us that in this Fortune 500 company that produces some 40% of the world’s electronics, the cruelty and hopelessness of workers‘ situation has not changed. But most of us are unaware that Xu is not alone. At least five other workers, and likely more than that, have joined him this year. Many other workers have taken their own lives since the famous 13.

Yi Xi: Union Official Links Foxconn Deaths to Excessive Overtime (LaborNotes)

The All-China Federation of Trade Unions—never distinguished for its advocacy protecting workers—has taken the unusual step of publicly criticizing Foxconn for excessive overtime.
Foxconn, the largest private employer in China, employs 1.2 million workers and produces a huge share of the world’s electronics.
On February 2, ACFTU Party Secretary Guo Jun publically criticized Foxconn’s excessive overtime work arrangements. Guo connected these problems to the series of worker suicides and deaths by overwork at its massive factory complex.
In an open letter response on February 3, Foxconn had the audacity to claim that “there is no relationship between constant overtime and incidents of death from overwork or suicide,” and referred to its infamous 2010 serial suicides as “unfortunate incidents with a few individual workers.”

Chun Han Wong: China Labor Ties Fray as Grievances Rise, Economic Growth Slows (Wall Street Journal)

For four years, a labor-research center here in the heart of China’s southern manufacturing belt helped to drive scholarship and debate on industrial relations in the world’s second-largest economy.
Then late last year, the International Center for Joint Labor Research, the first institute of its kind in China, was shut down, with little warning or explanation, people familiar with the situation said.
Its demise has alarmed labor experts, including some union officials, who see it as a setback for industrial relations just as China is dealing with rising worker grievances and slowing economic growth.

China executes mining tycoon Liu Han, who had links to ex-security tsar Zhou Yongkang (South China Morning Post, auch via Google News)

A Chinese mining tycoon linked to former security tsar Zhou Yongkang has been executed, according to state media.
Sichuan native Liu Han, 48, was found guilty of 13 charges – including murder, organising casinos, running a mafia-style gang and illegally selling firearms – and sentenced to death in late May.
He was executed on Monday morning together with his younger brother Liu Wei and three associates, Tang Xianbing, Zhang Donghua and Tian Xianwei, Xianning city intermediate court in Hubei province said.

AP: China executes mining tycoon Liu Han (Guardian)

Ernest Kao: Pepper spray and arrests as Tuen Mun parallel trader protest ends in chaos (South China Morning Post; auch via Google News)

Justine Drennan: Is China Making Its Own Terrorism Problem Worse? (Foreign Policy)

Beijing says radicalized members of its Uighur minority are terrorists with ties to the Islamic State and al Qaeda, but its repressive policies may be helping to fuel the violence.

Und außerdem:
Grace Tsoi: Taipei’s Fiery New Mayor Knows Whose Culture Is Best (Foreign Policy)

“For the [world’s] four Chinese-speaking regions — Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Mainland China — the longer the colonization, the more advanced a place is. It’s rather embarrassing. Singapore is better than Hong Kong; Hong Kong is better than Taiwan; Taiwan is better than the mainland. I’m speaking in terms of culture. I’ve been to Vietnam and mainland China. Even though the Vietnamese are seemingly poor, they always stop in front of red traffic lights and walk in front of green ones. Even though mainland China’s GDP is higher than that of Vietnam, if you ask me about culture, the Vietnamese culture is superior.”

David Volodzko: Was Colonialism Good for Asia? (Diplomat)

In controversial remarks, Taipei’s new mayor argued that colonialism is the secret to “more advanced” culture today.

Digitalisierung | Inselstreit
Sep 15th, 2014 by Gao

Paul Mason: China’s workers are turning from analogue slaves into digital rebels (Guardian)

With a wave of strikes co-ordinated on social media, the migrant workforce is using 21st-century tools to fight poverty, corruption and sweated labour

Au Loong-Yu: The Chinese CP, Japan and the South China Sea (Europe solidaire sans frontières)

If one does not find the CCP’s original position on the Diaoyu issue (to shelve the contention over the island’s sovereignty) over the top, one has to admit it is much more arrogant over the developments in the South China Sea. In the name of inheriting the “nine dash lines” rights of the Republic of China under the rule of KMT, it hugely expanded its claims of maritime territories, triggering objections from many countries. Unlike its policy towards Japan in which it proposed putting the contention on hold, the CCP has resorted more and more frequently to armed actions to assert its way in the South China Sea. I am not an expert on international law and would not be able to discuss the issue in that framework. Rather, I would like to have a closer look at the standard nationalist assertion, led by the CCP, that they “would not yield even an inch of the country’s sacred territory”. This is nonsense. The CCP has ironed out border issues time and again with its neighbours in its nearly seven decades in power. Has it always asserted adhering wholly and completely to the land inherited from the Qing Dynasty or the Republic of China? Obviously not. It certainly was not the case in its border deal with North Korea after the People’s Republic of China was founded.

平井纯一:領土ナショナリズム反対!(週刊かけはし) / 反对《领土国家主义》!(普羅民主網)

二〇〇〇万人を超えるアジア民衆、三一〇万人の日本民衆の悲惨きわまる死をもたらした天皇制日本帝国主義の侵略戦争が敗北に終わった八月一五日。今年の「八・一五」には韓国、中国との「竹島」(独島)、「尖閣諸島」(釣魚諸島)をめぐる紛争の新たな顕在化の中で、排外主義的ナショナリズムと「領土保全=安全保障の危機」キャンペーンが、日本国内であらためて大きくかきたてられた。

Historical Truths and Lies. Scarborough Shoal in Ancient Maps (Institute for Maritime and Ocean Affairs)
Michelle FlorCruz: China-Philippines Territorial Dispute: Ancient Maps ‚Debunk‘ Chinese Claim Over Scarborough Shoal (International Business Times)

The Philippines has upped the ante in its territorial dispute with China by fighting fire with fire, or in this case, a map with a map. The Philippines has recently unveiled an exhibit in Manila of 60 ancient maps of Asia that authorities say debunk China’s claimed „historical ownership“ over disputed areas of the South China Sea, specifically the Scarborough Shoal, located west of the Philippines.

Michelle FlorCruz: China’s New Vertical Map Gives Extra Play To Disputed South China Sea Territories (International Business Times)

In addition to China’s land borders, the newly released map has been extended to emphasize the disputed waters much more prominently than previous maps.
The map, which went on sale starting this week, was designed by the government-approved Hunan Map Press, and was designed to fully illustrate what China has always claimed in previous versions. “The islands of the South China Sea on the traditional map of China are shown in a cutaway box, and readers cannot fully, directly know the full map of China,” said the state-run People’s Daily, a mouthpiece of the Communist Party.

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