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Streik bei Cuiheng | Mindestreservesatz | Dokument Nr. 9
Apr 20th, 2015 by Gao

At the sharp end of the workers’ movement in China: The Zhongshan Cuiheng strike (China Labour Bulletin)

A month-long strike at a Japanese-owned bag manufacturer in the Pearl River Delta town of Zhongshan has been characterized by police violence, arrests and intimidation, and the absolute refusal of the boss to negotiate. Welcome to the sharp end of the workers’ movement in China.
The strike broke out in mid-March. The roughly 200 workers at Cuiheng Co. were unhappy at low-pay and the refusal of the company to pay social security and housing fund contributions, year-end bonuses and other benefits.

Tom Barnes, Kevin Lin: China’s growing labour movement offers hope for workers globally (Conversation)

Reuters: China’s central bank cuts reserve ratio (Guardian)

China’s central bank has cut the amount of cash that banks must hold as reserves on Sunday, the second industry-wide cut in two months, adding more liquidity to the world’s second-biggest economy to help spur bank lending and combat slowing growth.
The People’s Bank of China lowered the reserve requirement ratio (RRR) for all banks by 100 basis points to 18.5%, effective from Monday, the central bank said in a statement on its website.

Angus Grigg: China frees up $200b to stoke economy (Financial Review)

The RRR cut is expected to release around 1 trillion yuan ($208 billion) of capital into the economy.

China Steps Up Economy Help With Reduced Bank Reserve Ratios (Bloomberg)

The reserve-requirement ratio was lowered 1 percentage point Monday, the People’s Bank of China said. While that was the second reduction this year, the new level of 18.5 percent is still high by global standards. The cut will allow banks to boost lending by about 1.2 trillion yuan ($194 billion)…
The reserve ratio will be reduced by another percentage point for rural financial institutions, two additional percentage points for Agricultural Development Bank and a further 0.5 percentage point for banks with a certain level of loans to agriculture and small enterprises.
Those extra reductions give the move a “reformist flavor,” wrote Bloomberg economists Tom Orlik and Fielding Chen. Still, with growth weak and small companies most at risk, it’s understandable banks see state-owned firms as safer bets.
“As ever, the price of stronger growth is slower progress on structural reform,” they wrote.

Document 9: A ChinaFile Translation (ChinaFile)

This weekend, China’s leaders gather in Beijing for meetings widely expected to determine the shape of China’s economy, as well as the nation’s progress, over the next decade. What exactly the outcome of this Third Plenum of the Eighteenth Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party will be remains shrouded in no small measure of secrecy, like most matters of high politics in China. President Xi Jinping has signaled that a significant new wave of economic liberalization may be in the works. But in the realm of political reform, Xi also has signaled a deep reluctance. In fact, many of the actions taken and techniques used under his year of leadership suggest a return to ideas and tactics that hark back to the days of Mao Zedong.
One such signal came during this past spring, when reports began to appear that the Party leadership was being urged to guard against seven political “perils,” including constitutionalism, civil society, “nihilistic” views of history, “universal values,” and the promotion of “the West’s view of media.” It also called on Party members to strengthen their resistance to “infiltration” by outside ideas, renew their commitment to work “in the ideological sphere,” and to handle with renewed vigilance all ideas, institutions, and people deemed threatening to unilateral Party rule. These warnings were enumerated in a communiqué circulated within the Party by its General Office in April, and, because they constituted the ninth such paper issued this year, have come to be known as “Document 9.”

Daniel A. Bell: Teaching ‘Western Values’ in China (New York Times)

Nobody is surprised that the Chinese government curbs “Western-style” civil and political liberties. But it may be news to some people that the government has recently called for the strengthening of Marxist ideology in universities and a ban on “teaching materials that disseminate Western values in our classrooms.” On the face of it, such regulations are absurd. It would mean banning not just the ideas of John Stuart Mill and John Rawls, but also those of such thinkers as Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels.

Reporters Without Borders reveals state secrets in reaction to Gao Yu’s sentence (Reporters Without Borders)

Brian Eyler: China’s new silk roads tie together 3 continents (China Dialogue)

China recently unveiled an action plan for its controversial One Belt, One Road initiative to link its economy with the rest of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe. Known as the ‘new silk roads’, it combines new infrastructure networks of roads, railway lines, ports to strengthen trade, investment, and people-to-people cooperation.

Meinungsumfrage | Li Keqiang
Apr 19th, 2015 by Gao

Jennifer Pan, Xu Yiqing: China’s Ideological Spectrum (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

We offer the first large scale empirical analysis of ideology in contemporary China to determine whether individuals fall along a discernible and coherent ideological spectrum, and whether there are regional and inter-group variations in ideological orientation. Using principal component analysis (PCA) on a survey of 171,830 individuals, we identify one dominant ideological dimension in China. Individuals who are politically conservative, who emphasize the supremacy of the state and nationalism, are also likely to be economically conservative, supporting a return to socialism and state-control of the economy, and culturally conservative, supporting traditional, Confucian values. In contrast, political liberals, supportive of constitutional democracy and individual liberty, are also likely to be economic liberals who support market-oriented reform and social liberals who support modern science and values such as sexual freedom. This uni-dimensionality of ideology is robust to a wide variety of diagnostics and checks. Using post-stratification based on census data, we find a strong relationship between liberal orientation and modernization—provinces with higher levels of economic development, trade openness, urbanization are more liberal than their poor, rural counterparts, and individuals with higher levels of education and income and more liberal than their less educated and lower-income peers.

‘Ideological spectrum’ misreads local reality (Global Times)

Two students from Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a „China’s Ideological Spectrum,“ which covers 29 provinces, cities and autonomous regions in China, labeling them as „liberal“ (right), „conservative“ (left) and „neutral.“ They argue that a certain unification of politics, economy, society and culture exists in Chinese values, claiming that coastal areas with higher levels of economic development are mostly liberal regions, while the majority of individuals in the less developed provinces and cities in the central and western areas are conservative…
Foreign fallacies have constantly penetrated Chinese public opinion. These fallacies, which were disseminated under the cover of prestigious Western academic institutions or media, have proved deceptive. Domestic Chinese scholars as well as the media should spare no effort to expose them so as to the set the record straight.

Michael Forsythe: Survey Offers Rare Window Into Chinese Political Culture (New York Times)

A Chinese conservative supports the teachings of the philosopher Confucius, backs a strong state and wants the government to have a strong role in running the economy. Chinese liberals yearn for more civil liberties, believe in free-market capitalism and want more sexual freedom.
That’s the key finding of a new paper by two graduate students at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that draws on an online 50-question survey of more than 171,000 people to give a rare look into the lively political culture of what would be, if it were not in a Leninist straitjacket, the world’s biggest electorate…
The Chinese political divide differs from the current split between Republicans and Democrats in the United States. Chinese conservatives are, roughly, more akin to Southern Democrats who backed the New Deal of President Franklin D. Roosevelt — socially conservative but supporting a strong government hand in the economy. Liberals in China are more like American libertarians or traditional British liberals — socially progressive and supporting a lighter role for the government in the economy…
Ms. Pan said that the survey the paper drew on was not representative of the Chinese population, that their findings were preliminary and that she and Mr. Xu were seeking critiques on their methods from other scholars.
Most respondents were young, male college students living in prosperous coastal areas such as Beijing, Shanghai and the southern province of Guangdong.

杨家岱、吴晶:两位美国学者有关中国自由主义和保守主义分野的调查与分析(RFA)

中国人当中意识形态领域的分野是清楚的:保守派信奉孔孟之道、支持强势政府、希望政府在经济管理中发挥强有力的作用;自由派则追求更多的公民自由、笃信市场经济、向往更多性自由。

Chun Han Wong: Where China’s Liberals Live, and Why (Wall Street Journal)

“Provinces with higher levels of economic development, trade openness, urbanization are more liberal than their poor, rural counterparts,” the researchers said in a paper published online by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology late last week. Residents in inland regions, on the other hand, are more likely to subscribe to conservative calls for a powerful state and collectivist values, they added.

Lionel Barber, David Pilling, Jamil Anderlini: Interview: Li Keqiang on China’s challenges / Transcript (Financial Times)

Li Keqiang is directly responsible for managing what is now the world’s largest economy — at least in purchasing power terms — and leading Beijing’s efforts to move from the credit-fuelled, investment-led growth model of the past to a more sustainable future.
In his first interview with a western media organisation, Mr Li was relaxed, gregarious and clearly in command of his brief during an hour of questioning in the Hong Kong room of the Great Hall, a highly symbolic venue to receive a British newspaper editor.
His main message to the world was China’s continued commitment to the current global financial order, particularly in the wake of Beijing’s move to set up the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank…
Although the substance of the meeting was initially intended to be off the record, Mr Li later agreed to the FT publishing the entire discussion without any changes to his remarks — also unusual in the Chinese context.

AP: Veteran Chinese Journalist Gao Yu Sentenced to 7 Years (New York Times)

A Beijing court sentenced a veteran Chinese journalist to seven years in prison Friday after convicting her of leaking a document detailing the Communist Party leadership’s resolve to aggressively target civil society and press freedom as a threat to its monopoly on power.

1989
Jun 2nd, 2014 by Gao

Nach wie vor unübertroffen ist die dreistündige Dokumentation The Gate of Heavenly Peace von Carma Hinton und Richard Gordon.

Rückblick auf die Ereignisse aus der Sicht US-amerikanischer Medien:
Mike Chinoy, Craig Stubing, Clayton Dube Assignment: China – Tiananmen Square (YouTube / University of Southern California U.S.-China Institute)

Veranstaltungen in Wien:
4. Juni 1989 – 25 Jahre danach (Institut für Ostasienwissenschaften der Universität Wien)
Gezeigt wurde die WDR-Dokumentation “Tiananmen – 20 Jahre nach dem Massaker” (2009) von Shi Ming und Thomas Weidenbach.
Montag, 2. Juni 2014, 18 Uhr: Dokumentarfilm Tiananmen (D/Ö 2009) und anschließende Diskussion
Dienstag, 3. Juni 2014, 18.30 Uhr: Diskussionsveranstaltung zu Bedeutung und Wirkung des Protests und seiner gewaltsamen Niederschlagung (mit Impulsreferaten von Christian Göbel, Richard Trappl, Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik und einer studentischen Projektgruppe)

Matthias hat folgenden Link geschickt:
Mark Siemons: Was Mainstream ist, bestimmen wir (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

Weitere Artikel:
Anton Pam: Eine gescheiterte Revolution? (gongchao)
Voices from Tiananmen (South China Morning Post)
Twenty-five years since the Tiananmen protests: Legacies of the student-worker divide (Nào/libcom.org)
Long Xinming: Let’s Talk About Tiananmen Square, 1989 My Hearsay is Better Than Your Hearsay (NSNBC)
Edward Wong: Liu Heung Shing on Photographing Tiananmen (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs, Chris Buckley, Jonathan Ansfield: Tales of Army Discord Show Tiananmen Square in a New Light (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Chen Guang on the Soldiers Who Retook Tiananmen Square (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Far From Beijing, Jaded Students Inspired to Protest (New York Times)
Malcolm Moore: Wikileaks: no bloodshed inside Tiananmen Square, cables claim (Telegraph)
Zoe Li, David McKenzie: Crackdown on dissent ahead of Tiananmen Square 25th anniversary (CNN)
Alan Chin: Eyewitness Views: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square (Reuters)
Daniel F. Vukovich: Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989 (Social Science Research Network)
Kate Phillips: Springtime in Tiananmen Square, 1989 (Atlantic)
Terril Yue Jones: Tiananmen Square at 25 (Wilson Quarterly)
Ma Jian: Tiananmen Square 25 years on: ‚Every person in the crowd was a victim of the massacre‘ (Guardian)
Euan McKirdy: Chinese-Australian artist Guo Jian detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Tania Branigan: China to deport Tiananmen Square artist Guo Jian for visa fraud (Guardian)
Tania Branigan: Australian artist arrested for marking Tiananmen anniversary (Guardian)
Sophie Brown: Chinese journalist Gao Yu detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Dan Levin: China Escalating Attack on Google (New York Times)
APA: China blockt (sic) Google vor 25. Jahrestag des Pekinger Massakers (Standard)
APA: Hongkong: Hunderte Menschen demonstrieren vor Tiananmen-Jahrestag (Standard)
吴雨、李鱼:新闻报道刘晓波、许志永获颁美国民主奖 (Deutsche Welle)
翟亚菲:美国民主基金会又“颁奖”骚扰中国(环球时报)
Roy Greenslade: Foreign journalists in China harassed over Tiananmen Square anniversary (Guardian)
Lucy Davies: Tiananmen Square: the calm before the storm (Telegraph)
Chester Yung: Once Marked by Sadness, Hong Kong’s Tiananmen Vigil Now Stirs Anger (Wall Street Journal)
Paramita Ghosh: Book on Tiananmen Square massacre marks 25th anniversary (Hindustan Times)
Brian Becker: Tiananmen: the massacre that wasn’t (Party for Socialism and Liberation)

Liu Xiaobo | Panasiatische Eisenbahn
Mai 12th, 2014 by Gao

Reuters: האליטה הסינית קוראת להנהגה לשחרר את זוכה פרס נובל המוחזק בכלא (Haaretz)
Benjamin Kang Lim, Michael Martina, Ben Blanchard, Maxim Duncan, Sui-Lee Wee, Nick Macfie: Chinese elite push for release of jailed Nobel laureate (Reuters)

A group of „princelings“, children of China’s political elite, has quietly urged the Communist Party leadership to release jailed Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo on parole to improve the country’s international image, two sources said.

韩旭:泛亚高铁下月动工建设(京华时报)

分别从新疆和东北出发,一南一北建设两条洲际高铁连通欧洲;从昆明出发,建设一条高铁贯通东南亚诸国直达新加坡……这是中国高铁“走出去”的三大战略方向。而在更远的未来,中方有意与俄加美合作,建设一条横跨白令海峡,长达上万公里的高铁,连接亚美两个大洲。

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