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Arbeiterbewegung | Xinjiang | Verschuldung | Yanhuang Chunqiu | Polizeigewalt
Mai 30th, 2015 by Gao

Five years on, Nanhai Honda workers want more from their trade union (China Labour Bulletin)

Five years ago, on 17 May 2010, more than a thousand workers at the Nanhai Honda automotive components plant in Foshan walked off the job, initiating a high-profile, ground-breaking strike that came to symbolize the rise of the workers’ movement in China.
The strike secured the workers a 35 percent (500 yuan per month) pay increase plus the promise of more effective union representation after the official trade union was humiliated in its attempts to get the strikers back to work.
This week, China Labour Bulletin returned to Foshan and talked to some of the strike veterans about what has changed over the last five years and what still needs to be done.

Top China official’s criticism of labour policy sparks controversy (South China Morning Post)

In a speech to students of Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management on April 24, Finance Minister Lou Jiwei said China had a 50 per cent chance of sliding into the middle-income trap within the next five to 10 years when its annual gross domestic product growth slows to 5 per cent.
The middle-income trap refers to a situation where a country that has achieved stable growth becomes stuck at that level.
Comprehensive reforms were desperately needed to raise the urban labour supply in order to avoid falling into the trap and to ensure an annual 6.5 to 7 per cent GDP growth in the next few years, Lou said …
China’s labour contract law was flawed as it „reduced the labour market’s liquidity and flexibility“ by not allowing bosses to fire their workers, he said…
„That’s why many investors chose to leave China,“ Lou said.
In response, contributor Huang He wrote on Ground Breaking, a website focused on China’s disadvantaged group: „I understand his point is to meet the demand of capital increment by sacrificing workers‘ interests.
„[But] such a solution leaves Chinese labourers mired in low income and benefits capitalists in developed countries [instead].“
Lou also said China should cut farmers‘ subsidies, liberalise rural labour from farmlands, and improve its residence registration system so urban areas could have bigger labour populations.

Eset Sulaiman: Passports in Xinjiang’s Ili To Be Handed Into Police Stations: China (Radio Free Asia)
Emma Graham-Harrison: Chinese police order Yining residents to hand in passports in latest crackdown (Guardian)

A district of 5 million people in China’s restive far west has demanded that residents hand in their passports to the police for indefinite safekeeping, the latest government crackdown in an area where Beijing has declared a “people’s war” on violent separatists.
A notice posted in Yining city, nearly 2,000 miles west of Beijing and near the country’s border with Kazakhstan, said all passports should be surrendered by 15 May.
“Those who do not hand in their passports on time will be reported to the entry and exit bureau and, according to the relevant regulations, their passports will be cancelled,” the memo from a local police station said.

Fast wörtlich derselbe Bericht:
Edward Wong: Chinese Police Order Residents in a Xinjiang Prefecture to Turn In Passports (New York Times)

Enda Curran, Tu Lianting: China Has a Massive Debt Problem (Bloomberg)

Johnny Erling: Chinas mutigstes Reformmagazin steht vor dem Aus (Standard)

Chinas Führung will die einzige politische Reformzeitschrift des Landes zum Schweigen bringen, die sich traute, die Verbrechen Maos aufzudecken, und die KP-Diktatur zur Verfassungsherrschaft umwandeln möchte. Die „Yanhuang Chunqiu“ (China in allen Jahreszeiten) konnte sich ihrer Gleichschaltung 24 Jahre lang entziehen, weil ihre Autoren selbst einst allerhöchste Parteifunktionäre, Politiker oder bekannte Intellektuelle waren, die sich zu Radikalreformern gewandelt hatten. Peking hat die Juni-Nummer nun unter Vorzensur gestellt.

AP: Chinese policeman guns down unarmed traveller in front of his three children and elderly mother (South China Morning Post)

Railway police said the officer pulled the trigger after Xu Chunhe, 45, attacked him and tried to seize his gun on May 2.
But a private video clip circulating online shows the policeman using a long stick to beat Xu, who tried to dodge the blows and pull the stick away from the policeman. Local authorities have refused to release the full surveillance footage of the shooting…
Xu grew upset when he and his family were barred from boarding the train.
Impoverished and ill, Xu was travelling to Beijing to seek government assistance for his elderly mother and three children, which would have drawn unwelcome scrutiny on the local government.

Feministinnen | Streik bei Cuiheng
Apr 19th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong: China Releases 5 Women’s Rights Activists Detained for Weeks (New York Times)
Sui-lee Wee: China frees five women activists on bail after outcry (Reuters)
5 feminists released! Also: environmental struggles and the Great Cannon (Chuang)

China has unexpectedly released five women activists on bail, two lawyers said on Monday, after a vocal campaign against their detention by the West and Chinese rights campaigners.
The women were taken into custody on the weekend of March 8, International Women’s Day, and detained on suspicion of „picking quarrels and provoking trouble“. They had planned to demonstrate against sexual harassment on public transport.

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian: Online Support — and Mockery — Await Chinese Feminists After Release (Foreign Policy)
Detention of Five Chinese Feminist Activists at the Juncture of Beijing+20 – An Interview with Gender Scholar Wang Zheng (China Change)

Professor Wang Zheng (王政), of the University of Michigan, is a scholar whose research focuses on the modern and contemporary history of Chinese women and gender, and Chinese feminism in the era of globalization. Since 1993, Professor Wang has been working with Chinese domestic feminist scholars to promote feminist scholarship and establish courses in women studies and gender studies. She has also participated in the feminist movement itself in China over the years. On April 3rd, Professor Wang gave a speech at Brookings Institute in Washington, DC, about the recent arrest of the five Chinese feminists (starts around 48:00). On April 7th, the editor of this website talked to Professor Wang, further discussing the Chinese and global background of the incident and how it will impact the women’s rights movement in China.

Alexandria Icenhower: What China’s sexual revolution means for women (Brookings)
张红萍:1913 被抓捕的女权主义者们(法制网)

这些1905年就加入同盟会的女会员们,革命多年,并于辛亥革命时穿行于枪林弹雨中。昨日她们还是巾帼英雄,今日她们就成了国家的罪犯。当通缉令张贴满北京的大街小巷时,“女子参政同盟会”的女子们黯然神伤,挥泪告别她们的聚集地,结束了1904年她们就开始从事的女权运动

Josh Chin: A Reduced Sentence Shines Light on China’s Little-Known Opposition Parties (Wall Street Journal)

High profile strike at Zhongshan bag manufacturer enters tenth day (China Labour Bulletin)
Worker activism is now the new normal as strikes and protests erupt across China (China Labour Bulletin)

Dinny McMahon: Economists React: China’s Economic Growth Slows (Wall Street Journal)

Heather Timmons: Asia’s largest IPO this year is the latest sign that Chinese investors are ignoring reality (Quartz)

China’s stock markets have become completely detached from economic fundamentals in recent months, and that insanity is rapidly spilling into Hong Kong’s Stock Exchange. The latest evidence of irrational exuberance comes from the $3.6 billion IPO of GF Securities, a Chinese broker whose stock started up 40% in its Hong Kong trading debut today, in Asia’s largest listing this year.

Taxi drivers in Xiangtan create their own company in push for industry reform (China Labour Bulletin)

Andrew Browne: Vietnam’s Impossible Bind: How to Stand Up to Beijing (Wall Street Journal)

China’s military development a key theme in defense paper (Japan News / Yomiuri Shimbun)

Xu Beina: Media Censorship in China (Council on Foreign Relations)

Ian Johnson: China: What the Uighurs See (New York Review of Books)

Xinjiang is one of those remote places whose frequent mention in the international press stymies true understanding. Home to China’s Uighur minority, this vast region of western China is mostly known for being in a state of permanent low-grade conflict, with terrorist attacks and a ferocious government crackdown, even against moderate Uighur academics. To the outside world, Xinjiang conjures up a series of stock adjectives or phrases: “restive,” “Muslim,” “oppressed,” and—as the misleading titles of more than one recent book have it—China’s “Wild West.”
And yet few outsiders spend much time there. Foreign academics have largely been barred from research, with several prominent scholars of Xinjiang banned from entering China. Foreign journalists tend to fly in and out for a dateline and an interview. The American photographer Carolyn Drake is an exception.
Drake has been traveling to Xinjiang since 2007, when she began photographing Central Asia from her base in Istanbul. Over the years, she has come to know the region well, and struggled to break free from its clichés. The summation of her work is Wild Pigeon, an ambitious, beautiful, and crushingly sad book.

Frauentag
Mrz 10th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong: China Detains Several Women’s Rights Activists (New York Times)

China detained at least 10 women’s rights activists over the weekend to forestall a nationwide campaign against sexual harassment on public transportation that was to overlap with International Women’s Day, according to human rights advocates and associates of those detained.
At least five of the detained were still being held on Sunday evening, while the others had been released after being interrogated. All were women…
Most or all of the women were working to mobilize a nationwide campaign against sexual harassment on subways and other public transportation, their friends said. People partaking in the campaign were supposed to put antiharassment stickers on transit vehicles.

新婦女協進會關於敦促中國政府釋放女權活動家的聲明 (Google Docs)

香港婦女、性別團體對北京當局在未有充份理據的情況下,跨省拘捕五名知名的女權活動家,包括北京的李婷婷(麥子),韋婷婷,王曼,杭州的武嶸嶸和廣州的鄭楚然(大兔),表示嚴重關注,並敦促北京公安當局,尊重並恪守憲法賦予人民的言論自由,確保各相關人士的司法權利,予以律師及家人會見,確保其人身安全,並在未能查證有違法行為的情況下,立即釋放各人。……
就此,我們呼籲中國政府面對社會種種議題,應以實事求是的態度處理,完善立法、落實執行,才是解決問題的根本;而非拘禁提出問題的人,將其滅聲。我們再次強調對事件的關注,並將繼續跟進,直到上述各人得到釋放。

HKAAF: Signature Campaign to demand the release of the prominent feminists from Mainland (HKAAF / Google Docs)

Women and sexuality groups in Hong Kong express grave concern with the recent arrests by the Beijing authorities of five prominent female activists, including Li Tingting (李婷婷)(also known as Maizi麥子), Wei Tingting (韋婷婷), Wang Man (王曼) in Beijing, Wu Rongrong (武嶸嶸) in Hangzhou, and Zheng Churang (鄭楚然) (also known as Datu) in Guangzhou, but apparently with no solid legal ground. We urge the Beijing police to respect the freedom of speech as prescribed in the PRC Constitution, and ensure that the women’s legal procedural rights including rights to meet with lawyers and families, and rights to personal safety are strictly observed. We urge for their immediate release in so far as no sufficient evidence can be found to accuse them of any illegal act…
[W]e call for the Chinese government to look into the issues of social concerns genuinely, and resolve them with tenability by enhancing the standard of the laws and their implementation, instead of just maneuvering to quell the voice of the whistle blowers. We, the undersigned, would like to reiterate hereby our grave concerns of this recent series of arrests, and we will continue to monitor the situation unless the cases are handled with justice and activists are released.

Calling for Beijing Police to Release Chinese Feminist Activists Detained before International Women’s Day (EverMemo)
Simon Denyer, Xu Yangjingjing (sic): Detention of women’s rights activists casts shadow over China’s parliament meeting (Washington Post)

Meanwhile, Premier Li Keqiang quoted Mao Zedong’s famous assertion on Sunday that “women hold up half the sky,” and assured female lawmakers at the NPC that “you should believe that your male counterparts, holders of the other half of the sky, will move forward hand-in-hand with you.” …
[S]tate media continued its stunningly sexist coverage of the NPC sessions, desperately trying to glamorize the stage-managed affair with endless slideshows of the female volunteers employed to show delegates to their seats and pour them tea, and of the “beautiful” female reporters covering events.

Simon Denyer: Battered women in China could finally get a measure of legal protection (Washington Post)
Lily Kuo: China completely flunked International Women’s Day (Quartz)

China celebrated International Women’s Day by locking up at least eight female activists who had been planning a rally against sexual harassment this weekend. Instead of rallies for women’s rights, the holiday was marked by events in shopping malls where men wearing high heels raced through obstacle courses.

Coco Feng, Jane Li, Echo Hui: China’s “factory girls” have grown up—and are going on strike (Quartz)

Yang Liyan, a 30-year-old migrant worker, says she has cried twice in the past year. Once was when she was having her first meal in jail, and again after she was released and talking to her co-workers about her ordeal over dinner.
Yang was waiting for a scheduled meeting with the management of the Xinsheng Shoe Factory in the industrial metropolis of Guangzhou on Nov. 3, 2014, when she was thrown into the back of a police van. A total of 14 workers, including Yang and several other women, had gathered on behalf of 114 co-workers to fight for the severance pay they said they were owed after a three-month strike. They were arrested for “sabotaging production and business operations” (破坏生产经营), and in Yang’s case, jailed for 25 days.

Rüstungsbudget
Mrz 4th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong, Chris Buckley: China’s Military Budget Increasing 10% for 2015, Official Says (New York Times)

The Chinese military budget for 2015 will be about 10 percent bigger than last year’s, a senior Chinese official said on Wednesday, meaning that such spending is growing at a pace faster than the overall growth rate of the Chinese economy…
A 10 percent increase would put the 2015 military budget around $145 billion, making China the world’s second-largest military spender, though still far behind the United States, which spends more on its armed forces than the next eight countries combined.

Wettlauf mit den USA: China rüstet trotz Wachstumsschwäche kräftig auf (Spiegel)
APA: Chinas Rüstungsboom macht Nachbarn Sorge (Standard)

Der Wirtschaftsboom und die Sorge über die Übermacht des Westens haben Chinas Waffenausgaben in den vergangenen zehn Jahren in die Höhe schnellen lassen. Zwischen 2004 und 2013 sind die Ausgaben in der Volksrepublik nach Schätzungen um 170 Prozent gestiegen. Das lässt bei seinen Nachbarn die Alarmglocken schrillen.

Yang Fan, Ho Shan: Generals probed in Xi’s graft purge (Asia Times / Radio Free Asia)

The ruling Chinese Communist Party is investigating 14 generals for corruption as a nationwide anti-graft campaign widens to encompass the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), official media reported on Monday.
Among those under investigation is navy Rear Adm. Guo Zhenggang, son of a former vice-chairman of the party’s Central Military Commission (CMC), which commands the armed forces headed by President Xi Jinping, the country’s defense ministry said in a statement.

Sozialversicherungssystem | Mao Zedong | Long Baorong | Propaganda
Feb 14th, 2015 by Gao

China’s social security system (China Labour Bulletin)

The problems in China’s social security system can be traced back to two key events: The break-up of the state-run economy, which had provided urban workers with an “iron rice bowl” (employment, housing, healthcare and pension), and the introduction of the one-child policy in the 1980s, which meant that parents could no longer rely on a large extended family to look after them in their old age. In other words, as the economy developed and liberalized in the 1990s and 2000s, both the state and social structures that had supported workers in their old age, ill-health and during times of economic hardship gradually vanished, leaving a huge vacuum to fill.
The Chinese government sought to create a new social security system based on individual employment contracts that would make employers, rather than the state, primarily responsible for contributions to pensions, unemployment, medical, work-related injury and maternity insurance. In addition, the government established a housing fund designed to help employees, who no longer had housing provided for them, buy their own home…
After China embarked on its much vaunted economic reform and development program, the government gradually abdicated its authority in labour relations to business interests. As the private sector expanded, employers could unilaterally and arbitrarily determine the pay and working conditions of their employees, keeping wages low and benefits largely non-existent. The national government sought to protect the interests of workers by implementing legislation, such as the 1994 Labour Law and 2008 Labour Contract Law, however local governments either could not or would not enforce the law in the workplace.
Under these circumstances, creating a system where employers are primarily responsible for their employees’ social security was doomed to failure. Employers could often simply ignore their legal obligations and continue with business as usual, often with official connivance…
The failure of the Chinese government to enforce the law and create a social security system that covers everyone has not only disadvantaged China’s workers, it has severely hampered the government’s own ability to push ahead with and accomplish other important policy goals.

Rebecca E. Karl, Michael Schoenhals, Andrew J. Nathan, Richard Bernstein, Ho-Fung Hung, Sebastian Heilmann: Is Mao Still Dead? (ChinaFile)

It has long been standard operating procedure for China’s leaders to pay tribute to Mao. Even as the People’s Republic he wrought has embraced capitalist behavior with ever more heated ardor, the party he founded has remained firmly in power and his portrait has stared out over Tiananmen Square toward the squat building where his body reposes peacefully at the heart of a country he would scarcely recognize. But since Xi Jinping’s arrival at the helm, Mao’s words have seemed to reverberate more loudly. From the rejection of liberalism that colors the internal Party directive known as Document 9, to Education Minister Yuan Guiren’s recent speech demanding an “ideological campaign,” to Xi’s own speeches which seem to reference Mao and Marx far more often than his predecessors’, Chinese politics under Xi seem to have taken a hard ideological turn. How significant is this phenomenon and what does it mean? Is Mao still dead?

Edward Wong: China Sentences 27 Linked to Official Who Reported Graft (New York Times, auch via Google News)

A court in southern China has sentenced to prison 27 family members and supporters of a former official, now dead, who had sought to expose local corruption, a lawyer for one of them said Thursday.
The large number of people sentenced in a single trial for what their advocates have said were political rather than criminal activities was unusual. All were members of the Miao ethnic group, more commonly known in the West as the Hmong.
The former official, Long Baorong, of Fenghuang County in Hunan Province, was detained by Communist Party investigators in 2010 after he raised questions about the local government. In 2011, a court sentenced him to four or five years in prison for fraud and embezzlement, but he was unexpectedly released in 2012. He died shortly afterward, according to the lawyer, Ma Gangquan.

Luisetta Mudie: China Jails Ethnic Miao Leader’s Relatives, Supporters For ‚Triad‘ Activities (Radio Free Asia)

《网信精神》 (YouTube)

网络强国 网在哪光荣梦想在哪
网络强国 从遥远的宇宙到思念的家
网络强国 告诉世界中国梦在崛起大中华
网络强国 一个我在世界代表着国家

Josh Chin, Chun Han Wong: China’s Internet Censors Now Have Their Own Theme Song, And It Is Glorious (Wall Street Journal)
Und im wilden Nordwesten:
新疆喀什市《小苹果》广场舞大赛第一季全记录(天山网)
Rachel Lu: ‘De-radicalizing’ Xinjiang, One Bad Pop Song at a Time (Foreign Policy)

Prozess gegen Ilⱨam Tohti
Sep 18th, 2014 by Gao

Jonathan Kaiman: China begins trial of Ilham Tohti (Guardian)

Chinese authorities began trying the Uighur academic Ilham Tohti on charges of “separatism” on Wednesday morning, in what human rights groups have called a “travesty of justice” that underscores the government’s unwillingness to field even moderate criticisms of its ethnic policies.
Tohti, 44, is being tried at the Urumqi intermediate court in Urumqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uighur autonomous region, more than 1,800 miles (3,000km) west of his home in Beijing. He will almost certainly be convicted; possible sentences range from 10 years to life in prison. He firmly denies the charge.

Uigurischer Regimekritiker vor chinesischem Gericht (Deutsche Welle)
Johnny Erling: Xinjiang will Uigurenanwalt Tohti zum Terroristen stempeln (Standard)
Johhny Erling: China statuiert Exempel an Bürgerrechtler (Welt)
Edward Wong: Uighur Scholar Ilham Tohti Goes on Trial in China on Separatist Charges (New York Times)

Mr. Tohti had been harshly treated throughout the detention, his lawyers say. “He was never allowed to see his family anytime during the eight months of detention,” Mr. Li said. “He was not allowed to meet with lawyers for the first five months.”
Seven students of Mr. Tohti have also been detained, and some have been formally arrested and charged, the parents of one student said in an interview near the courthouse here. The parents said the police in Urumqi had sent them a notice saying their son was being charged with harming the security of the state. They have been unable to contact him since his arrest in Beijing on Jan. 15, they said.

Separatism trial of Uighur professor in China enters second day (AFP/Yahoo)

Nine diplomats from countries including Germany, Britain and Canada travelled to Urumqi to observe the trial but were barred from entering the courtroom.

ئىلھام توختى سوتتا خىتاي تەپتىش ئەمەلدارىنىڭ بارلىق ئەيىبلەشلىرىنى رەت قىلدى (Radio Free Asia)

ئىلھام توختىنىڭ چارشەنبە كۈنى باشلانغان ئۈرۈمچى شەھەرلىك ئوتتۇرا سوت مەھكىمىسىدىكى سوتىنىڭ تۇنجى كۈنى، تەپتىش ئەمەلدارى ئۆزىنىڭ ئەيىبنامىسىنى ئوقۇپ ئۆتۈپ، ئىلھامنى «دۆلەتنى پارچىلاشقا»، «شىنجاڭنى مۇستەقىل قىلىشقا» ئۇرۇنۇش بىلەن ئەيىبلىگەن ۋە بۇ قارىشىنى ئىلگىرى سۈرىدىغان «پاكىتلار» نى ئوتتۇرىغا قويغان. تەپتىش ئەمەلدارى ئەيىبنامىسىدە، ئىلھام توختىنىڭ بۇرۇنقى ئوقۇغۇچىلىرىنىڭ «گۇۋاھلىق» سۆزلىرىنى پاكىت قىلىپ كۆرسىتىپ، بۇنى ئىلھامنىڭ بۆلگۈنچىلىك بىلەن شۇغۇللانغانلىقىنىڭ ئىسپاتى قىلىپ ئوتتۇرىغا قويغان. لېكىن ئىلھام توختىنىڭ ئادۋوكاتى لى فاڭپىڭ ئۇنىڭ ئۆزىگە قارىتىلغان بارلىق ئەيىبلەشنى رەت قىلىدىغانلىقىنى بىلدۈردى.

Timeline of Ilham Tohti’s Case (Human Rights Watch)

Thomas Latschan: Ilham Tohti – der leise Kritiker (Deutsche Welle)

An der Minzu-Universität in Peking untersuchte Tohti unter anderem über mehrere Jahre die soziale Lage der Uiguren in seiner Heimatprovinz Xinjiang. Dabei kam er zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Uiguren in Xinjiang keineswegs den Han-Chinesen gleichgestellt sind. Im Gegenteil: Für Uiguren gebe es weniger Arbeitsplätze, sie würden für die gleiche Arbeit schlechter bezahlt und von den chinesischen Behörden systematisch benachteiligt.
Nach den Unruhen von 2009 wurden die Sicherheitsmaßnahmen in der Provinz Xinjiang massiv verschärft
Wiederholt kritisierte Tohti die Politik der Zentralregierung gegenüber den Uiguren. Im Gegensatz zu anderen uigurischen Regimekritikern – wie der mittlerweile in den USA lebenden Rebiyah Kadeer – gilt er als gemäßigter Regimekritiker, der immer für eine bessere Verständigung zwischen Uiguren und Han-Chinesen geworben hat.

Celia Hatton: Is Ilham Tohti friend or foe of China? (BBC)

So, is Ilham Tohti really a moderate? It depends who you ask.
China’s mission to the EU appears not to think so.
The mission said in August that Mr Tohti had been „personally involved“ in orchestrating two episodes of violence in Xinjiang, diplomatic sources have told the BBC.

Uyghur Scholar Tohti ‚Humiliated‘ in Prison, Shackled Again (Radio Free Asia)
Reuters: Uighur academic held on separatism charges in China kept in shackles (Guardian)

Lawyer for economics professor Ilham Tohti says his client has also been denied warm clothes ahead of his trial this week…
„We intend to send somebody to the trial,“ the EU ambassador to China, Hans Dietmar Schweisgut, told reporters when asked if the EU would dispatch a diplomat to Urumqi even if China did not respond to its request to allow an observer in court.

ئىلھام توختىنىڭ ئايالى گۈزەلنۇر ۋە قېرىنداشلىرى سوتقا قاتنىشىش ئۈچۈن ئۈرۈمچىگە يېتىپ كەلدى (Radio Free Asia)
ئىلھام توختى سوتلانغان كۈنى ئامېرىكا ئەلچىسى ئۈرۈمچىگە كەلگەن (Radio Free Asia)
خەلقئارا جەمئىيەت ۋە قانۇنچىلار ئىلھام توختىنىڭ سوتىغا يېقىندىن كۆڭۈل بۆلمەكتە (Radio Free Asia)

1989
Jun 2nd, 2014 by Gao

Nach wie vor unübertroffen ist die dreistündige Dokumentation The Gate of Heavenly Peace von Carma Hinton und Richard Gordon.

Rückblick auf die Ereignisse aus der Sicht US-amerikanischer Medien:
Mike Chinoy, Craig Stubing, Clayton Dube Assignment: China – Tiananmen Square (YouTube / University of Southern California U.S.-China Institute)

Veranstaltungen in Wien:
4. Juni 1989 – 25 Jahre danach (Institut für Ostasienwissenschaften der Universität Wien)
Gezeigt wurde die WDR-Dokumentation “Tiananmen – 20 Jahre nach dem Massaker” (2009) von Shi Ming und Thomas Weidenbach.
Montag, 2. Juni 2014, 18 Uhr: Dokumentarfilm Tiananmen (D/Ö 2009) und anschließende Diskussion
Dienstag, 3. Juni 2014, 18.30 Uhr: Diskussionsveranstaltung zu Bedeutung und Wirkung des Protests und seiner gewaltsamen Niederschlagung (mit Impulsreferaten von Christian Göbel, Richard Trappl, Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik und einer studentischen Projektgruppe)

Matthias hat folgenden Link geschickt:
Mark Siemons: Was Mainstream ist, bestimmen wir (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

Weitere Artikel:
Anton Pam: Eine gescheiterte Revolution? (gongchao)
Voices from Tiananmen (South China Morning Post)
Twenty-five years since the Tiananmen protests: Legacies of the student-worker divide (Nào/libcom.org)
Long Xinming: Let’s Talk About Tiananmen Square, 1989 My Hearsay is Better Than Your Hearsay (NSNBC)
Edward Wong: Liu Heung Shing on Photographing Tiananmen (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs, Chris Buckley, Jonathan Ansfield: Tales of Army Discord Show Tiananmen Square in a New Light (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Chen Guang on the Soldiers Who Retook Tiananmen Square (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Far From Beijing, Jaded Students Inspired to Protest (New York Times)
Malcolm Moore: Wikileaks: no bloodshed inside Tiananmen Square, cables claim (Telegraph)
Zoe Li, David McKenzie: Crackdown on dissent ahead of Tiananmen Square 25th anniversary (CNN)
Alan Chin: Eyewitness Views: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square (Reuters)
Daniel F. Vukovich: Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989 (Social Science Research Network)
Kate Phillips: Springtime in Tiananmen Square, 1989 (Atlantic)
Terril Yue Jones: Tiananmen Square at 25 (Wilson Quarterly)
Ma Jian: Tiananmen Square 25 years on: ‚Every person in the crowd was a victim of the massacre‘ (Guardian)
Euan McKirdy: Chinese-Australian artist Guo Jian detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Tania Branigan: China to deport Tiananmen Square artist Guo Jian for visa fraud (Guardian)
Tania Branigan: Australian artist arrested for marking Tiananmen anniversary (Guardian)
Sophie Brown: Chinese journalist Gao Yu detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Dan Levin: China Escalating Attack on Google (New York Times)
APA: China blockt (sic) Google vor 25. Jahrestag des Pekinger Massakers (Standard)
APA: Hongkong: Hunderte Menschen demonstrieren vor Tiananmen-Jahrestag (Standard)
吴雨、李鱼:新闻报道刘晓波、许志永获颁美国民主奖 (Deutsche Welle)
翟亚菲:美国民主基金会又“颁奖”骚扰中国(环球时报)
Roy Greenslade: Foreign journalists in China harassed over Tiananmen Square anniversary (Guardian)
Lucy Davies: Tiananmen Square: the calm before the storm (Telegraph)
Chester Yung: Once Marked by Sadness, Hong Kong’s Tiananmen Vigil Now Stirs Anger (Wall Street Journal)
Paramita Ghosh: Book on Tiananmen Square massacre marks 25th anniversary (Hindustan Times)
Brian Becker: Tiananmen: the massacre that wasn’t (Party for Socialism and Liberation)

Freihandelszonen | Korruption | Inselstreit
Sep 20th, 2013 by Gao

Shanghai zone to allow free yuan convertibility (The Standard)
Li Xiaokun and Zhang Yuwei: Silk Road to take on a new look (China Daily)

Alex Calvo: Manila, Beijing, and UNCLOS: A Test Case?
(Japan Focus)

Chris Buckley, Jonathan Ansfield: Senior Chinese Official Falls Under Scrutiny as Some Point to Larger Inquiry (New York Times)

The Chinese Communist Party announced Sunday that a senior official responsible for overseeing state-owned corporations was under investigation, and people with knowledge of that case and many others said that, according to senior officials, the inquiries were part of a larger corruption investigation encroaching on the retired chief of the domestic security apparatus.

Raymond Li: The corruption investigation of Jiang Jiemin, a former chairman of China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), and several other senior officials at the state-owned energy firm has shed light on how powerful executives dubbed the „Shengli gang“ carved out their network in Shandong early in their careers.

Prozess gegen Bo Xilai
Sep 9th, 2013 by Gao

Edward Wong: In Trial Account, Chinese Ex-Official Strays From Script (New York Times)

In secret remarks on the final session of his trial, Bo Xilai, the fallen Communist Party star, denied on Monday that he had tried to upset the party’s selection of top leaders or grab extensive new powers for himself, according to a court observer’s written record of his closing statement.
That part of Mr. Bo’s statement, providing a glimpse of the power politics many believe were behind the purging of Mr. Bo in 2012, did not appear in court transcripts released …

Bo Guagua’s Statement (New York Times)

Ältere Artikel:
Tania Branigan: China indicts Bo Xilai for corruption (Guardian)

The 64-year-old’s case will be heard in Jinan, in eastern Shandong province, probably within weeks. …
Wu Qiang, a political scientist at Tsinghua University, noted: „We all know Bo’s trial resulted from the struggles between the different interest groups inside the party.“
He said that charging Bo with economic rather than political crimes suggested a deal because they were „using the way of handling a fly to handle a tiger“.

Reuters: Bo Xilai’s lawyer ’not allowed‘ to represent him during trial (Guardian)

Gu Yushu, a lawyer appointed by Bo’s sister, Bo Jieying, said on Thursday he would not be allowed to represent Bo during his trial, which is likely to open this month, as authorities attempt to close the door on China’s biggest political scandal in decades. …
The news of Bo being denied his sister’s choice of legal representation comes as Chinese police detained a supporter of Bo who had urged people to protest against the upcoming trial, underlining government nervousness about the case. …
„For such kinds of cases, who will act as lawyers are all arranged by the higher-ups,“ said He Weifang, a law professor from Peking University who has followed the Bo case. „Whoever acts as the lawyer will not affect the outcome of the trial.“ …
Gu Kailai and Zhang Xiaojun, an aide to the Bo family, were both denied their choice of lawyers at their trials last year and had to accept government-appointed lawyers. Zhang was also jailed.

Reuters: Police in China arrest Bo Xilai supporter Song Yangbiao (Guardian)

Song Yangbiao, a reporter for the magazine The Time Weekly, was detained on Sunday on charges of „picking quarrels and causing trouble“, according to friends and supporters, apparently after using his Sina Weibo microblog to denounce the trial and call for an uprising to oppose it.

Janet Ong, Michael Forsythe: China to Probe Former Security Chief Zhou Over Graft, SCMP Says (Bloomberg)

Umweltaktivismus
Mai 28th, 2013 by Gao

Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Ralph Litzinger: The Pollution Crisis and Environmental Activism in China (Dissent)
Edward Wong: In China, Breathing Becomes a Childhood Risk (New York Times)

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