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Kulturrevolution – Fellner, Brown, Wemheuer, Mai/Chou, Rittenberg, Wasserstrom
Mai 15th, 2016 by Gao

Hannes Fellner: »Rebellion ist gerechtfertigt« (junge Welt)

Die »Große Proletarische Kulturrevolution« war ein Zeitabschnitt in der Geschichte der Volksrepublik China, der widersprüchlicher nicht sein konnte. Die Kulturrevolution stand und steht gleichzeitig für Voluntarismus und diktatorische Maßnahmen von den um Mao Zedong versammelten Kadern der Kommunistischen Partei Chinas (KPCh), aber auch für eine partizipative und demokratische Massenbewegung. Sie stand und steht gleichzeitig für gesellschaftliches Chaos und Not, aber auch für ökonomischen, sozialen und kulturellen Fortschritt, welcher die Grundlagen für den Wirtschaftsboom des Landes ab den späten 1970er Jahren legte. Sie stand und steht gleichzeitig für Chinas Besinnung nach innen und seine internationale Isolation, aber auch für den Beginn seines Aufstiegs zur Weltmacht.

Ian Johnson: Jeremy Brown on the Cultural Revolution at the Grass Roots | 50周年纪念之外,被忽略的文革历史 (New York Times)

Jeremy Brown, 39, a history professor at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia, studied in Harbin and did research in Tianjin, focusing especially on the rural-urban divide in China under Mao Zedong. Most recently, he helped edit “Maoism at the Grassroots: Everyday Life in China’s Era of High Socialism.” In an interview, he discussed the 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution, what we miss in elite-focused narratives from that time and his pursuit of flea-market historiography.

Felix Wemheuer: 50 Jahre Kulturrevolution: Der Kampf geht weiter (Deutsche Welle)

50 Jahre nach dem Ausbruch der „Großen Proletarischen Kulturrevolution“ [hat] die chinesische Gesellschaft noch immer keinen Konsens gefunden, wie Maos Massenbewegung zu beurteilen ist.

Felix Wemheuer: Kulturrevolution und die Neue Linke im Westen (Deutsche Welle)
Jun Mai, Oliver Chou: Cultural Revolution, 50 years on (South China Morning Post)

Fifty years ago today, China issued a top directive calling on its people to rid society of “members of the bourgeoisie threatening to seize political power from the proletariat” – marking the start of a decade-long violent class struggle.
For 10 tumultuous years from 1966, the country underwent massive sociopolitical upheaval that saw countless politicians and intellectuals driven to their deaths, civilians killed in armed conflicts, and cultural relics and artefacts destroyed. The official death toll numbered more than 1.7 million.

Wen Liu: Sidney Rittenberg on Cultural Revolution 50 years later, its violence, its lessons (WA China Watch Digest)

This website was not meant to be this political. But one cannot watch China and skip a historic date, May 16, the 50th anniversary of the official start of the Cultural Revolution from 1966-1976, which served as perhaps more than anything dark, scorched, bloody yet fertile soil for, as well as a huge rear-view mirror of, today’s China of skyscrapers, bullet trains, Xi Jinping, and even Internet censorship. One cannot also watch China and forget that it was in 1972, during the Cultural Revolution, that President Nixon went to meet Mao in Beijing. To help us reflect on the Cultural Revolution, its meaning, its violence, its lessons, there is no better person than a great fellow Washingtonian, journalist, scholar, a participant as well as a prisoner of not only the Cultural Revolution, but for 35 years Mao’s revolution: Sidney Rittenberg.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom: How Will China Mark the 50th Anniversary of the Cultural Revolution? (Nation)

This month marks the anniversary of two surges of youth activism in China. One, the May 4 Movement, began with student protests 97 years ago. The other is the 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution, which is sometimes said to have begun with the first Red Guards putting up wall posters in late May of 1966. May 4 and Red Guard activists were once seen as part of related movements, but now they tend to be regarded as radically dissimilar.

Recycling-Arbeiter | Börsen
Aug 28th, 2015 by Gao

Tom Phillips: China’s workers abandon the city as Beijing faces an economic storm (Guardian)

Labour disputes are rising and some workers are leaving for the country amid fears a crashing economy could cause political and social unrest.

Peter Lee: Making Sense of China’s Stock Market Meltdown (CounterPunch)

I suppose much of the journo commentariat was born since 2008 and therefore has no memory of TARP, Too Big To Fail, or Jamie Dimon rolling around naked inside a gigantic vat of taxpayer money, so there has been a considerable amount of handwring about how the CCP defiled the purity of the stock market by flinging a trillion or so RMB at the markets in a faltering attempt to moderate the collapse of share prices on the Shanghai exchange.
“Purity of the stock market”. Chew on that a while.

Streik | Atomkraft | Monsanto | 1989
Mai 30th, 2015 by Gao

Elaine Hui: Chinese Bike Light Strikers Occupy Factory, Face Firings and Arrests (Labor Notes)

Workers who make bike lights at a factory in Shenzhen, China, have been on strike since April 30, demanding that the company pay up what it legally owes them.
The strikers stayed overnight in the factory, stopping production and delivery for two weeks, until police came to evict them and arrest worker leaders on May 13.
New An Lun Lamp, a Taiwanese-owned factory, produces bicycle lights for brands including the German Messingschlager and Buchel and the Dutch AXA.
There are about 100 workers in the factory, mostly middle-aged women, with some nearing retirement.
Though their actions have been peaceful, thus far 13 workers have been fired and nine arrested by police for “disrupting public order.”
Seven out of the nine detained workers were released within 24 hours. The other two—including one of the workers’ elected representatives—were held by police for seven days. During the police raid on May 13 these two clutched the legs of the general manager and his son, crying and begging them not to remove the finish goods.

Migrant worker in Nanjing cheated out of compensation and left to die (China Labour Bulletin)

Listed in Shanghai, Hong Kong, London and New York, China Petroleum and Chemical Corp (Sinopec) is one of China’s largest and best-known companies. It has a vast network of subsidiaries including Yangzi Petrochemical based in Nanjing. This company reportedly owns or has an interest in Nanjing Yangzi Maintenance and Installation (南京扬子检修安装), which employed Chen Dejun, a young migrant worker from the neighbouring province of Anhui.
Chen started work at Yangzi Maintenance and Installation in July 2010. Within 18 months, he started to experience dizziness, irregular heartbeat, headaches and tremors – all the symptoms of benzene poisoning, and almost certainly the result of his work doing spray-painting, acid washing, chemical cleaning and toxic waste disposal at the plant.
Today, Chen is seriously ill and bedridden but he has still not received any compensation because his employer did everything it could to prevent his illness from being classified by the authorities as an occupational disease.

Robert Foyle Hunwick: Desperate Chinese are turning to mass suicide to get their government’s attention (Global Post)

The location was chosen for maximum impact: a downtown boulevard, famous for Beijing’s swankiest shops and its plushest hotels. Studded with these symbols of Western capitalist chic, Wangfujing Shopping Street could hardly be further from the more desperate concerns of rural China.
It was here that a group of about 30 men gathered on a warm spring morning and, in front of hundreds of shoppers, swallowed a quantity of pesticide. They fell to the ground en masse and, according to several eyewitnesses, foamed at the mouth.
As the men were rushed to hospital, startled crowds spread the news on social media, while the scene quickly returned to normal. Police issued a statement later that day that none had died; local reports explained they were taxi drivers from the northeast, who’d traveled to the capital to stage the protest…
In August 2013, a group of 21, also from Heilongjiang, attempted mass suicide near the Beijing West rail station, after a railway company failed to provide their children with the public-service jobs they were promised. Four months later, 13 homeowners attempted the same over a failure to be compensated for demolitions. In two incidents in July last year, five petitioners drank poison in a police station, and five men and two women from Jiangsu, did the same outside the offices of the China Youth Daily newspaper. They were dissatisfied with the terms of their eviction.

孟山都滚出中国! (monsanto-out-of-china.org)

Emma Graham-Harrison: China warned over ‚insane‘ plans for new nuclear power plants (Guardian)

China’s plans for a rapid expansion of nuclear power plants are “insane” because the country is not investing enough in safety controls, a leading Chinese scientist has warned.
Proposals to build plants inland, as China ends a moratorium on new generators imposed after the Fukushima disaster in March 2011, are particularly risky, the physicist He Zuoxiu said, because if there was an accident it could contaminate rivers that hundreds of millions of people rely on for water and taint groundwater supplies to vast swathes of important farmlands.
China halted the approval of new reactors in 2011 in order to review its safety standards, but gave the go-ahead in March for two units, part of an attempt to surpass Japan’s nuclear-generating capacity by 2020 and become the world’s biggest user of nuclear power a decade later.
Barack Obama recently announced plans to renew a nuclear cooperation deal with Beijing that would allow it to buy more US-designed reactors, and potentially pursue the technology to reprocess plutonium from spent fuel…
He, who worked on China’s nuclear weapons programme, said the planned rollout was going too fast to ensure it had the safety and monitoring expertise needed to avert an accident.
“There are currently two voices on nuclear energy in China. One prioritises safety while the other prioritises development,” He told the Guardian in an interview at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
He spoke of risks including “corruption, poor management abilities and decision-making capabilities”. He said: “They want to build 58 (gigawatts of nuclear generating capacity) by 2020 and eventually 120 to 200. This is insane.”

Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian: These Chinese People Want High-Speed Rail So Badly They Are Fighting Police to Get It (Foreign Policy)

On May 16, thousands of people carrying banners marched through the streets of Linshui, a county in the southwest Chinese province of Sichuan. Some shouted slogans while others hurled rocks at lines of police in riot gear, who pushed back against the crowds and beat some with batons. Photographs show several people with bloody head injuries being cared for by paramedics and onlookers. Linshui residents turned out in droves, burned vehicles, and braved riot police for more than eight hours — not to protest inequality, corruption, or environmental degradation, but to demand that a high-speed rail line be built through their county.

Wolfgang Pomrehn: Chinas Investitions-Offensive (Telepolis)

Die Volksrepublik verstärkt ihren Kapitalexport und steckt viel Geld in den Aufbau von Eisenbahnen und anderer Infrastruktur in befreundeten Ländern.

Gu Yi etc.: On the 26th Anniversary of Tian’anmen Massacre (Sri Lanka Guardian)

We are a group of Chinese students born in the 1980s and 1990s and now studying abroad. Twenty-six years ago on June 4th, young students, in life’s prime with innocent love for their country just as we are today, died under the gun of the People’s Liberation Army in Beijing’s streets.

境外势力试图煽动八零后九零后(《环球时报》 im Google-Speicher. Das Original wurde mittlerweile gelöscht.)

十几名自称是“八零后和九零后”的在美“中国留学生”日前联署了一封致国内青年学生的公开信,就八九政治风波发表充满“民运味”、像是被手把手教着写出来的极端观点。它以十分凶悍的语言攻击中国现政权,照抄海外一些势力的话语歪曲讲述26年前发生的事情。通常来说,中国大陆赴美留学生即使思想发生一些变化,也写不出如此赤裸裸攻击祖国的文稿。

Hostile forces target younger generation (Global Times)

Eleven Chinese students born in the 1980s or 1990s and studying in the US recently signed an open letter to their counterparts in the mainland. The letter carries their extreme views on the 1989 Tiananmen incident in the tone that used to be adopted by much older pro-democracy activists. It harshly attacked the current Chinese regime, twisting the facts of 26 years ago with narratives of some overseas hostile forces. Generally, even if changes in thought do take place, it’s unlikely for mainland students who study in the US to lash out at their homeland in such an insulting way.

Emma Graham-Harrison: Chinese students in the west call for transparency over Tiananmen Square (Guardian)
范凌志:香港左翼爱国团体立场坚定反对泛民(《环球时报》)

Writing China: Rian Thum, ‘The Sacred Routes of Uyghur History’ (Wall Street Journal)

Julian Ryall: China plans for North Korean regime collapse leaked (Washington Post)

China has drawn up detailed contingency plans for the collapse of the North Korean government, suggesting that Beijing has little faith in the longevity of Kim Jong-un’s regime.
Documents drawn up by planners from China’s People’s Liberation Army that were leaked to Japanese media include proposals for detaining key North Korean leaders and the creation of refugee camps on the Chinese side of the frontier in the event of an outbreak of civil unrest in the secretive state.

Paul Mason: How to turn a liberal hipster into a capitalist tyrant in one evening (Guardian)

A new play, World Factory, asks the audience to run a clothing factory in China – and even the creators have been surprised at how people have behaved.

Frank Langfitt: How China’s Censors Influence Hollywood (NPR)

Meinungsumfrage | Li Keqiang
Apr 19th, 2015 by Gao

Jennifer Pan, Xu Yiqing: China’s Ideological Spectrum (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

We offer the first large scale empirical analysis of ideology in contemporary China to determine whether individuals fall along a discernible and coherent ideological spectrum, and whether there are regional and inter-group variations in ideological orientation. Using principal component analysis (PCA) on a survey of 171,830 individuals, we identify one dominant ideological dimension in China. Individuals who are politically conservative, who emphasize the supremacy of the state and nationalism, are also likely to be economically conservative, supporting a return to socialism and state-control of the economy, and culturally conservative, supporting traditional, Confucian values. In contrast, political liberals, supportive of constitutional democracy and individual liberty, are also likely to be economic liberals who support market-oriented reform and social liberals who support modern science and values such as sexual freedom. This uni-dimensionality of ideology is robust to a wide variety of diagnostics and checks. Using post-stratification based on census data, we find a strong relationship between liberal orientation and modernization—provinces with higher levels of economic development, trade openness, urbanization are more liberal than their poor, rural counterparts, and individuals with higher levels of education and income and more liberal than their less educated and lower-income peers.

‘Ideological spectrum’ misreads local reality (Global Times)

Two students from Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a „China’s Ideological Spectrum,“ which covers 29 provinces, cities and autonomous regions in China, labeling them as „liberal“ (right), „conservative“ (left) and „neutral.“ They argue that a certain unification of politics, economy, society and culture exists in Chinese values, claiming that coastal areas with higher levels of economic development are mostly liberal regions, while the majority of individuals in the less developed provinces and cities in the central and western areas are conservative…
Foreign fallacies have constantly penetrated Chinese public opinion. These fallacies, which were disseminated under the cover of prestigious Western academic institutions or media, have proved deceptive. Domestic Chinese scholars as well as the media should spare no effort to expose them so as to the set the record straight.

Michael Forsythe: Survey Offers Rare Window Into Chinese Political Culture (New York Times)

A Chinese conservative supports the teachings of the philosopher Confucius, backs a strong state and wants the government to have a strong role in running the economy. Chinese liberals yearn for more civil liberties, believe in free-market capitalism and want more sexual freedom.
That’s the key finding of a new paper by two graduate students at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that draws on an online 50-question survey of more than 171,000 people to give a rare look into the lively political culture of what would be, if it were not in a Leninist straitjacket, the world’s biggest electorate…
The Chinese political divide differs from the current split between Republicans and Democrats in the United States. Chinese conservatives are, roughly, more akin to Southern Democrats who backed the New Deal of President Franklin D. Roosevelt — socially conservative but supporting a strong government hand in the economy. Liberals in China are more like American libertarians or traditional British liberals — socially progressive and supporting a lighter role for the government in the economy…
Ms. Pan said that the survey the paper drew on was not representative of the Chinese population, that their findings were preliminary and that she and Mr. Xu were seeking critiques on their methods from other scholars.
Most respondents were young, male college students living in prosperous coastal areas such as Beijing, Shanghai and the southern province of Guangdong.

杨家岱、吴晶:两位美国学者有关中国自由主义和保守主义分野的调查与分析(RFA)

中国人当中意识形态领域的分野是清楚的:保守派信奉孔孟之道、支持强势政府、希望政府在经济管理中发挥强有力的作用;自由派则追求更多的公民自由、笃信市场经济、向往更多性自由。

Chun Han Wong: Where China’s Liberals Live, and Why (Wall Street Journal)

“Provinces with higher levels of economic development, trade openness, urbanization are more liberal than their poor, rural counterparts,” the researchers said in a paper published online by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology late last week. Residents in inland regions, on the other hand, are more likely to subscribe to conservative calls for a powerful state and collectivist values, they added.

Lionel Barber, David Pilling, Jamil Anderlini: Interview: Li Keqiang on China’s challenges / Transcript (Financial Times)

Li Keqiang is directly responsible for managing what is now the world’s largest economy — at least in purchasing power terms — and leading Beijing’s efforts to move from the credit-fuelled, investment-led growth model of the past to a more sustainable future.
In his first interview with a western media organisation, Mr Li was relaxed, gregarious and clearly in command of his brief during an hour of questioning in the Hong Kong room of the Great Hall, a highly symbolic venue to receive a British newspaper editor.
His main message to the world was China’s continued commitment to the current global financial order, particularly in the wake of Beijing’s move to set up the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank…
Although the substance of the meeting was initially intended to be off the record, Mr Li later agreed to the FT publishing the entire discussion without any changes to his remarks — also unusual in the Chinese context.

AP: Veteran Chinese Journalist Gao Yu Sentenced to 7 Years (New York Times)

A Beijing court sentenced a veteran Chinese journalist to seven years in prison Friday after convicting her of leaking a document detailing the Communist Party leadership’s resolve to aggressively target civil society and press freedom as a threat to its monopoly on power.

Harmonie etc. p. p.
Apr 12th, 2015 by Gao

中共中央 国务院关于构建和谐劳动关系的意见(新华)

劳动关系是生产关系的重要组成部分,是最基本、最重要的社会关系之一。劳动关系是否和谐,事关广大职工和企业的切身利益,事关经济发展与社会和谐。党和国家历来高度重视构建和谐劳动关系,制定了一系列法律法规和政策措施并作出工作部署。各级党委和政府认真贯彻落实党中央和国务院的决策部署,取得了积极成效,总体保持了全国劳动关系和谐稳定。但是,我国正处于经济社会转型时期,劳动关系的主体及其利益诉求越来越多元化,劳动关系矛盾已进入凸显期和多发期,劳动争议案件居高不下,有的地方拖欠农民工工资等损害职工利益的现象仍较突出,集体停工和群体性事件时有发生,构建和谐劳动关系的任务艰巨繁重。

Chun Han Wong: China Aims to Soothe Labor Unrest (Wall Street Journal)

As slowing growth fuels labor unrest in the world’s second-largest economy, China’s top leadership is pushing for greater efforts to foster harmony across its increasingly agitated workforce.
In a recent directive, top Communist Party and government officials called on party cadres and bureaucrats across the country to “make the construction of harmonious labor relations an urgent task,” to ensure “healthy economic development” and to consolidate the party’s “governing status.”

女权主义者被拘第35天,公民寄出媒体报道呼吁检方不予批捕(Evernote)
Edward Wong: Chinese Police Seeking Charges Against Detained Women’s Activists, Lawyer Says (New York Times)

Tingting Shen: Inside the world of China’s trans sex workers (Gay Star News)

Reuters: 2000 police used to quell pollution protest in China which left one dead (Guardian)

One person died and 50 were arrested after some 2,000 police, using rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannons, put down a protest by villagers against pollution from a chemical plant in China’s Inner Mongolia, an overseas human rights group said…
In the latest incident, villagers in Naiman Banner took to the streets to protest against a chemical processing zone they said was polluting farmland and grazing land, the New York-based Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Centre said in a statement late on Monday.
The group quoted a witness as saying police used rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannons to disperse the demonstrators, leading to one death.

2015年春季人才流动分析报告(智联招聘~中商情报网)

智联招聘发布的《2015春节白领跳槽调研》报告中显示,在12228份调查问卷中,47.8%的白领已经在春节前后更新了简历在找工作中,而有13.7%的白领已经办理了离职或新工作的入职手续。超过半数的白领在春季选择了跳槽。
   当跳槽已成为职场常态。白领怎么跳?跳去哪里?在跳槽的过程中职业规划发生了哪些改变?为此,智联招聘根据2015年春节后白领投递简历行为的全站大数据,独家发布《2015春季人才流动分析报告》为广大白领解读跳槽的方向与选择。

Chun-Wei Yap: Amid Corruption Crackdown, 10,000 Chinese Officials Want New Jobs (Wall Street Journal)

David E. Sanger, Rick Gladstone: Piling Sand in a Disputed Sea, China Literally Gains Ground (New York Times)

The clusters of Chinese vessels busily dredge white sand and pump it onto partly submerged coral, aptly named Mischief Reef, transforming it into an island.
Over a matter of weeks, satellite photographs show the island growing bigger, its few shacks on stilts replaced by buildings. What appears to be an amphibious warship, capable of holding 500 to 800 troops, patrols the reef’s southern opening.

Patrick McGee, Jamil Anderlini: China inflation misses Beijing target (Financial Times)

Subdued demand and falling oil prices last month pulled Chinese inflation well below Beijing’s target of “around 3 per cent” for this year.
China’s consumer price index maintained a sluggish year-on-year pace of 1.4 per cent in March, the same rate as in February, according to the government’s official figures.
Forecasters had predicted the CPI would decelerate to 1.3 per cent.
However, the bigger problem was at factory gates. Producer prices deflated for a 37th consecutive month in March, falling 4.6 per cent, versus a 4.8 per cent fall in February.
That is the longest period of factory gate deflation in China on record.

Pengpeng: “This society is creating angry youth”: memoir of a punk in Wuhan (Chuǎng)

Kaiser Kuo, David Moser, Rogier Creemers: Cyber Leninism and the Political Culture of the Chinese Internet (China File)

Tania Branigan: Top Chinese TV presenter filmed insulting Mao at private dinner (Guardian)

Frauentag
Mrz 10th, 2015 by Gao

Edward Wong: China Detains Several Women’s Rights Activists (New York Times)

China detained at least 10 women’s rights activists over the weekend to forestall a nationwide campaign against sexual harassment on public transportation that was to overlap with International Women’s Day, according to human rights advocates and associates of those detained.
At least five of the detained were still being held on Sunday evening, while the others had been released after being interrogated. All were women…
Most or all of the women were working to mobilize a nationwide campaign against sexual harassment on subways and other public transportation, their friends said. People partaking in the campaign were supposed to put antiharassment stickers on transit vehicles.

新婦女協進會關於敦促中國政府釋放女權活動家的聲明 (Google Docs)

香港婦女、性別團體對北京當局在未有充份理據的情況下,跨省拘捕五名知名的女權活動家,包括北京的李婷婷(麥子),韋婷婷,王曼,杭州的武嶸嶸和廣州的鄭楚然(大兔),表示嚴重關注,並敦促北京公安當局,尊重並恪守憲法賦予人民的言論自由,確保各相關人士的司法權利,予以律師及家人會見,確保其人身安全,並在未能查證有違法行為的情況下,立即釋放各人。……
就此,我們呼籲中國政府面對社會種種議題,應以實事求是的態度處理,完善立法、落實執行,才是解決問題的根本;而非拘禁提出問題的人,將其滅聲。我們再次強調對事件的關注,並將繼續跟進,直到上述各人得到釋放。

HKAAF: Signature Campaign to demand the release of the prominent feminists from Mainland (HKAAF / Google Docs)

Women and sexuality groups in Hong Kong express grave concern with the recent arrests by the Beijing authorities of five prominent female activists, including Li Tingting (李婷婷)(also known as Maizi麥子), Wei Tingting (韋婷婷), Wang Man (王曼) in Beijing, Wu Rongrong (武嶸嶸) in Hangzhou, and Zheng Churang (鄭楚然) (also known as Datu) in Guangzhou, but apparently with no solid legal ground. We urge the Beijing police to respect the freedom of speech as prescribed in the PRC Constitution, and ensure that the women’s legal procedural rights including rights to meet with lawyers and families, and rights to personal safety are strictly observed. We urge for their immediate release in so far as no sufficient evidence can be found to accuse them of any illegal act…
[W]e call for the Chinese government to look into the issues of social concerns genuinely, and resolve them with tenability by enhancing the standard of the laws and their implementation, instead of just maneuvering to quell the voice of the whistle blowers. We, the undersigned, would like to reiterate hereby our grave concerns of this recent series of arrests, and we will continue to monitor the situation unless the cases are handled with justice and activists are released.

Calling for Beijing Police to Release Chinese Feminist Activists Detained before International Women’s Day (EverMemo)
Simon Denyer, Xu Yangjingjing (sic): Detention of women’s rights activists casts shadow over China’s parliament meeting (Washington Post)

Meanwhile, Premier Li Keqiang quoted Mao Zedong’s famous assertion on Sunday that “women hold up half the sky,” and assured female lawmakers at the NPC that “you should believe that your male counterparts, holders of the other half of the sky, will move forward hand-in-hand with you.” …
[S]tate media continued its stunningly sexist coverage of the NPC sessions, desperately trying to glamorize the stage-managed affair with endless slideshows of the female volunteers employed to show delegates to their seats and pour them tea, and of the “beautiful” female reporters covering events.

Simon Denyer: Battered women in China could finally get a measure of legal protection (Washington Post)
Lily Kuo: China completely flunked International Women’s Day (Quartz)

China celebrated International Women’s Day by locking up at least eight female activists who had been planning a rally against sexual harassment this weekend. Instead of rallies for women’s rights, the holiday was marked by events in shopping malls where men wearing high heels raced through obstacle courses.

Coco Feng, Jane Li, Echo Hui: China’s “factory girls” have grown up—and are going on strike (Quartz)

Yang Liyan, a 30-year-old migrant worker, says she has cried twice in the past year. Once was when she was having her first meal in jail, and again after she was released and talking to her co-workers about her ordeal over dinner.
Yang was waiting for a scheduled meeting with the management of the Xinsheng Shoe Factory in the industrial metropolis of Guangzhou on Nov. 3, 2014, when she was thrown into the back of a police van. A total of 14 workers, including Yang and several other women, had gathered on behalf of 114 co-workers to fight for the severance pay they said they were owed after a three-month strike. They were arrested for “sabotaging production and business operations” (破坏生产经营), and in Yang’s case, jailed for 25 days.

Urbanisierung | Wachstum | Lateinamerika
Jan 30th, 2015 by Gao

Eli Friedman: The Urbanization of the Chinese Working Class (Jacobin)

China has problems. Not despite thirty-five years of record-breaking growth, but because of it. The country’s dependence on exports and investment-led development has resulted in stark inequality, underconsumption, over-investment, disappearing arable land, exorbitant housing prices, and a looming environmental catastrophe. This leaves China increasingly vulnerable to a number of potential crises: external economic shocks, housing market collapse, mass defaults on public debt, and fits of social unrest.
What, then, might ensure the stability of Chinese capitalism for another generation?
For the state, a big part of the answer is urbanization. In the recently released National New Urbanization Plan (2014–2020), the central government calls for more than 100 million people to move to cities by 2020, pushing China’s urban population to 60 percent. The plan sets out admirable goals such as an expansion of public housing, education, and health services, a reduction in carbon emissions and other environmentally destructive activities, and preservation of agricultural land through limits on sprawl.

Jonathan Kaiman, Heather Stewart: Hard times return as China bids to bring its economic miracle to an end (Guardian)

Beijing insists slow growth is part of a plan to bring years of explosive expansion under control. But the global slowdown may make it hard to soft-land an economy still hooked on exports…
Official figures published last week showed that China’s GDP expanded by 7.4% in 2014. That was a significant drop from the 7.7% seen in 2013, and the weakest rate of growth since 1990…

Ralf Streck: China mischt den „Hinterhof“ der USA auf (Telepolis)

Nicht nur der Brics-Staat Russland treibt im Zuge der Sanktionspolitik der USA und Europas verstärkt Projekte in Lateinamerika voran (…). Den großen Wurf will nun das große Brics-Land China in der Region machen, die in den USA so gerne als „Hinterhof“ bezeichnet wird. In Washington ist man nicht sehr erfreut darüber, dass allein China im kommenden Jahrzehnt rund 250 Milliarden US-Dollar in Mittel- und Südamerika und der Karibik investieren will, womit sich das Handelsvolumen auf eine halbe Billion verdoppeln soll. Wichtigster Handelspartner Brasiliens (ebenfalls ein Brics-Staat) ist schon jetzt nicht mehr die USA, sondern China. Und das gilt auch schon für Chile und Peru. Über diese Entwicklung ist das Imperium im Norden besorgt. Das Tauwetter zwischen den USA und Kuba muss in diesem Zusammenhang gesehen werden.

Nebenbei:
Geoffrey Crothall: People’s Daily tries and fails to understand problem of wage arrears in China (China Labour Bulletin)
Ian Johnson: The Rat Tribe of Beijing (AlJazeera)
APA: Bürgermeister: Peking „wirklich nicht lebenswert“ (Standard)
Reuters: China stellt Milizen an der Grenze zu Nordkorea auf (Standard)
Catherine Phillips: $242 Billion High-Speed Beijing-Moscow Rail Link Approved (Newsweek)
APA: Chinesen bauen Bostoner U-Bahn (Standard)

Prozess gegen Ilⱨam Tohti
Sep 18th, 2014 by Gao

Jonathan Kaiman: China begins trial of Ilham Tohti (Guardian)

Chinese authorities began trying the Uighur academic Ilham Tohti on charges of “separatism” on Wednesday morning, in what human rights groups have called a “travesty of justice” that underscores the government’s unwillingness to field even moderate criticisms of its ethnic policies.
Tohti, 44, is being tried at the Urumqi intermediate court in Urumqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uighur autonomous region, more than 1,800 miles (3,000km) west of his home in Beijing. He will almost certainly be convicted; possible sentences range from 10 years to life in prison. He firmly denies the charge.

Uigurischer Regimekritiker vor chinesischem Gericht (Deutsche Welle)
Johnny Erling: Xinjiang will Uigurenanwalt Tohti zum Terroristen stempeln (Standard)
Johhny Erling: China statuiert Exempel an Bürgerrechtler (Welt)
Edward Wong: Uighur Scholar Ilham Tohti Goes on Trial in China on Separatist Charges (New York Times)

Mr. Tohti had been harshly treated throughout the detention, his lawyers say. “He was never allowed to see his family anytime during the eight months of detention,” Mr. Li said. “He was not allowed to meet with lawyers for the first five months.”
Seven students of Mr. Tohti have also been detained, and some have been formally arrested and charged, the parents of one student said in an interview near the courthouse here. The parents said the police in Urumqi had sent them a notice saying their son was being charged with harming the security of the state. They have been unable to contact him since his arrest in Beijing on Jan. 15, they said.

Separatism trial of Uighur professor in China enters second day (AFP/Yahoo)

Nine diplomats from countries including Germany, Britain and Canada travelled to Urumqi to observe the trial but were barred from entering the courtroom.

ئىلھام توختى سوتتا خىتاي تەپتىش ئەمەلدارىنىڭ بارلىق ئەيىبلەشلىرىنى رەت قىلدى (Radio Free Asia)

ئىلھام توختىنىڭ چارشەنبە كۈنى باشلانغان ئۈرۈمچى شەھەرلىك ئوتتۇرا سوت مەھكىمىسىدىكى سوتىنىڭ تۇنجى كۈنى، تەپتىش ئەمەلدارى ئۆزىنىڭ ئەيىبنامىسىنى ئوقۇپ ئۆتۈپ، ئىلھامنى «دۆلەتنى پارچىلاشقا»، «شىنجاڭنى مۇستەقىل قىلىشقا» ئۇرۇنۇش بىلەن ئەيىبلىگەن ۋە بۇ قارىشىنى ئىلگىرى سۈرىدىغان «پاكىتلار» نى ئوتتۇرىغا قويغان. تەپتىش ئەمەلدارى ئەيىبنامىسىدە، ئىلھام توختىنىڭ بۇرۇنقى ئوقۇغۇچىلىرىنىڭ «گۇۋاھلىق» سۆزلىرىنى پاكىت قىلىپ كۆرسىتىپ، بۇنى ئىلھامنىڭ بۆلگۈنچىلىك بىلەن شۇغۇللانغانلىقىنىڭ ئىسپاتى قىلىپ ئوتتۇرىغا قويغان. لېكىن ئىلھام توختىنىڭ ئادۋوكاتى لى فاڭپىڭ ئۇنىڭ ئۆزىگە قارىتىلغان بارلىق ئەيىبلەشنى رەت قىلىدىغانلىقىنى بىلدۈردى.

Timeline of Ilham Tohti’s Case (Human Rights Watch)

Thomas Latschan: Ilham Tohti – der leise Kritiker (Deutsche Welle)

An der Minzu-Universität in Peking untersuchte Tohti unter anderem über mehrere Jahre die soziale Lage der Uiguren in seiner Heimatprovinz Xinjiang. Dabei kam er zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Uiguren in Xinjiang keineswegs den Han-Chinesen gleichgestellt sind. Im Gegenteil: Für Uiguren gebe es weniger Arbeitsplätze, sie würden für die gleiche Arbeit schlechter bezahlt und von den chinesischen Behörden systematisch benachteiligt.
Nach den Unruhen von 2009 wurden die Sicherheitsmaßnahmen in der Provinz Xinjiang massiv verschärft
Wiederholt kritisierte Tohti die Politik der Zentralregierung gegenüber den Uiguren. Im Gegensatz zu anderen uigurischen Regimekritikern – wie der mittlerweile in den USA lebenden Rebiyah Kadeer – gilt er als gemäßigter Regimekritiker, der immer für eine bessere Verständigung zwischen Uiguren und Han-Chinesen geworben hat.

Celia Hatton: Is Ilham Tohti friend or foe of China? (BBC)

So, is Ilham Tohti really a moderate? It depends who you ask.
China’s mission to the EU appears not to think so.
The mission said in August that Mr Tohti had been „personally involved“ in orchestrating two episodes of violence in Xinjiang, diplomatic sources have told the BBC.

Uyghur Scholar Tohti ‚Humiliated‘ in Prison, Shackled Again (Radio Free Asia)
Reuters: Uighur academic held on separatism charges in China kept in shackles (Guardian)

Lawyer for economics professor Ilham Tohti says his client has also been denied warm clothes ahead of his trial this week…
„We intend to send somebody to the trial,“ the EU ambassador to China, Hans Dietmar Schweisgut, told reporters when asked if the EU would dispatch a diplomat to Urumqi even if China did not respond to its request to allow an observer in court.

ئىلھام توختىنىڭ ئايالى گۈزەلنۇر ۋە قېرىنداشلىرى سوتقا قاتنىشىش ئۈچۈن ئۈرۈمچىگە يېتىپ كەلدى (Radio Free Asia)
ئىلھام توختى سوتلانغان كۈنى ئامېرىكا ئەلچىسى ئۈرۈمچىگە كەلگەن (Radio Free Asia)
خەلقئارا جەمئىيەت ۋە قانۇنچىلار ئىلھام توختىنىڭ سوتىغا يېقىندىن كۆڭۈل بۆلمەكتە (Radio Free Asia)

1989
Jun 2nd, 2014 by Gao

Nach wie vor unübertroffen ist die dreistündige Dokumentation The Gate of Heavenly Peace von Carma Hinton und Richard Gordon.

Rückblick auf die Ereignisse aus der Sicht US-amerikanischer Medien:
Mike Chinoy, Craig Stubing, Clayton Dube Assignment: China – Tiananmen Square (YouTube / University of Southern California U.S.-China Institute)

Veranstaltungen in Wien:
4. Juni 1989 – 25 Jahre danach (Institut für Ostasienwissenschaften der Universität Wien)
Gezeigt wurde die WDR-Dokumentation “Tiananmen – 20 Jahre nach dem Massaker” (2009) von Shi Ming und Thomas Weidenbach.
Montag, 2. Juni 2014, 18 Uhr: Dokumentarfilm Tiananmen (D/Ö 2009) und anschließende Diskussion
Dienstag, 3. Juni 2014, 18.30 Uhr: Diskussionsveranstaltung zu Bedeutung und Wirkung des Protests und seiner gewaltsamen Niederschlagung (mit Impulsreferaten von Christian Göbel, Richard Trappl, Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik und einer studentischen Projektgruppe)

Matthias hat folgenden Link geschickt:
Mark Siemons: Was Mainstream ist, bestimmen wir (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)

Weitere Artikel:
Anton Pam: Eine gescheiterte Revolution? (gongchao)
Voices from Tiananmen (South China Morning Post)
Twenty-five years since the Tiananmen protests: Legacies of the student-worker divide (Nào/libcom.org)
Long Xinming: Let’s Talk About Tiananmen Square, 1989 My Hearsay is Better Than Your Hearsay (NSNBC)
Edward Wong: Liu Heung Shing on Photographing Tiananmen (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs, Chris Buckley, Jonathan Ansfield: Tales of Army Discord Show Tiananmen Square in a New Light (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Chen Guang on the Soldiers Who Retook Tiananmen Square (New York Times)
Andrew Jacobs: Far From Beijing, Jaded Students Inspired to Protest (New York Times)
Malcolm Moore: Wikileaks: no bloodshed inside Tiananmen Square, cables claim (Telegraph)
Zoe Li, David McKenzie: Crackdown on dissent ahead of Tiananmen Square 25th anniversary (CNN)
Alan Chin: Eyewitness Views: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square (Reuters)
Daniel F. Vukovich: Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989 (Social Science Research Network)
Kate Phillips: Springtime in Tiananmen Square, 1989 (Atlantic)
Terril Yue Jones: Tiananmen Square at 25 (Wilson Quarterly)
Ma Jian: Tiananmen Square 25 years on: ‚Every person in the crowd was a victim of the massacre‘ (Guardian)
Euan McKirdy: Chinese-Australian artist Guo Jian detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Tania Branigan: China to deport Tiananmen Square artist Guo Jian for visa fraud (Guardian)
Tania Branigan: Australian artist arrested for marking Tiananmen anniversary (Guardian)
Sophie Brown: Chinese journalist Gao Yu detained ahead of Tiananmen anniversary (CNN)
Dan Levin: China Escalating Attack on Google (New York Times)
APA: China blockt (sic) Google vor 25. Jahrestag des Pekinger Massakers (Standard)
APA: Hongkong: Hunderte Menschen demonstrieren vor Tiananmen-Jahrestag (Standard)
吴雨、李鱼:新闻报道刘晓波、许志永获颁美国民主奖 (Deutsche Welle)
翟亚菲:美国民主基金会又“颁奖”骚扰中国(环球时报)
Roy Greenslade: Foreign journalists in China harassed over Tiananmen Square anniversary (Guardian)
Lucy Davies: Tiananmen Square: the calm before the storm (Telegraph)
Chester Yung: Once Marked by Sadness, Hong Kong’s Tiananmen Vigil Now Stirs Anger (Wall Street Journal)
Paramita Ghosh: Book on Tiananmen Square massacre marks 25th anniversary (Hindustan Times)
Brian Becker: Tiananmen: the massacre that wasn’t (Party for Socialism and Liberation)

Aktuelle Streiks nach Region
Apr 23rd, 2014 by Gao

Folgende Zusammenstellung stammt von „Husunzi“.

Bei Yue Yuen in Dongguan streiken noch immer 10.000–50.000 von 40.000–60.000 Arbeiter_innen:
China sports shoe factory halts production as strike escalates (Financial Times)
东莞裕元罢工诗抄:运动正是高峰!(新生代)

Bei Yue Yuen in Jiangxi streiken 2.000 Arbeiter_innen in Solidarität mit ihren Kolleg_innen in Dongguan:
Jonathan Kaiman: Strike spreads at Chinese supplier to Adidas and Nike (Guardian)

In Henan streiken seit über zwei Wochen tausende Lehrer_innen:
Jiang Pei, Lin Jing, Luisetta Mudie: Henan Teachers Vow to Keep Marching Over Pay Demands (Radio Free Asia)

In Shenzhen streiken seit dem 16. April tausende Busfahrer_innen:
Thousands of bus company workers strike in Shenzhen (China Labour Bulletin)
深圳东部公交千人罢工抗议低待遇 警察强行驱散(新生代)

In Beijing streiken tausend Arbeiter_innen eines Motorenwerkes:
维灵、何山:北京千人罢工争补偿 (Radio Free Asia)

In Foshan streiken seit zwei Tagen Straßenkehrer_innen:
冯雷亮、曾群善:佛山百名环卫工罢工要求涨薪千元 每月收入所剩无几(新生代)

In Dongguan begannen Taxifahrer_innen am 18. April einen Streik:
Dongguan cabbies launch strike amid business slowdown (South China Morning Post)

Außerdem gibt es u.a. Proteste in Maoming gegen den Bau einer Chemiefabrik und Proteste in Wenzhou gegen Übergriffe vonseiten des Städtischen Ordnungsdienstes (城管).

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