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Papiertiger Trump
Feb 11th, 2017 by Gao

Tom Phillips: ‚Brutal, amoral, ruthless, cheating‘: how Trump’s new trade tsar sees China (Guardian, 22. Dezember)

The United States and China will fight a war within the next 10 years over islands in the South China Sea, and “there’s no doubt about that”. At the same time, the US will be in another “major” war in the Middle East.
Those are the views – nine months ago at least – of one of the most powerful men in Donald Trump’s administration, Steve Bannon, the former head of far-right news website Breitbart who is now chief strategist at the White House.

The Chinese government is a despicable, parasitic, brutal, brass-knuckled, crass, callous, amoral, ruthless and totally totalitarian imperialist power that reigns over the world’s leading cancer factory, its most prolific propaganda mill and the biggest police state and prison on the face of the earth.
That is the view of Peter Navarro, the man chosen by Donald Trump to lead a new presidential office for US trade and industrial policy, a move likely to add to Beijing’s anxieties over the billionaire’s plans for US-China relations.

Benjamin Haas: Steve Bannon: ‚We’re going to war in the South China Sea … no doubt‘ (Guardian, 2. Februar)
Tom Phillips: Donald Trump and China on dangerous collision course, say experts (Guardian, 7. Februar)

For the last 18 months a taskforce of prominent China experts, some of whom have dealt with Beijing for more than 50 years, has been formulating a series of recommendations on how the incoming White House should conduct relations with the world’s second largest economy.
The group’s report, which was handed to the White House on Sunday and will be published in Washington DC on Tuesday, says ties between the two nuclear-armed countries could rapidly deteriorate into an economic or even military confrontation if compromise on issues including trade, Taiwan and the South China Sea cannot be found.

AFP: South China Sea: US reports ‚unsafe encounter‘ with Chinese military aircraft (Guardian, 10. Februar)

A Chinese military aircraft had an “unsafe” encounter with a US navy surveillance aircraft near a contested reef in the South China Sea, according to the US Pacific command.
The two planes came within 1,000ft (300 meters) of each other during Wednesday’s incident near the Scarborough shoal, which is claimed by both the Philippines and China, according to Pentagon spokesman Jeff Davis.

Und dann löst sich alles in Wohlgefallen auf?

Tom Phillips: Trump agrees to support ‚One China‘ policy in Xi Jinping call (Guardian, 10. Februar)

Donald Trump has held his first telephone conversation with the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, since entering the White House, telling the Communist party leader he will not challenge Beijing by upending longstanding US policy towards Taiwan.
In a brief statement the White House said the leaders of the world’s two largest economies had held a “lengthy” and “extremely cordial” telephone call on Thursday evening in which “numerous topics” were discussed…
The cordial encounter follows an “unsafe” one on Wednesday in the South China Sea between a Chinese aircraft and a US Navy patrol plane. US Pacific Command spokesman Robert Shuford said on Friday the “interaction” between a Chinese KJ-200 early warning aircraft and a US Navy P-3C plane happened in international airspace but did not say what was regarded as unsafe.

Simon Tisdall: China U-turn is latest sign Trump may turn out to be a paper tiger (Guardian)

Is Donald Trump turning out to be a paper tiger? China’s rulers might be forgiven for thinking so after the US president performed a U-turn on Taiwan, but the shift did not come out of the blue.
Trump’s approach to a range of key international issues has softened significantly since he took office, suggesting a lurch towards conformity and away from disruption. His acceptance of the One China policy, under which Washington does not challenge Beijing’s claim to what it deems a breakaway province, was a stunning reversal, contradicting previous suggestions he would pursue closer ties with Taiwan.

Wukan
Dez 28th, 2016 by Gao

China jails nine over protests in Guangdong “democracy” village (South China Morning Post)

Nine Guangdong villagers have been jail for up to 10 years for taking part in protests in September in a community once seen as a symbol of grass-roots democracy in China.
Villagers in Wukan, 170km northeast of Hong Kong, expressed frustration over the sentencing, which critics said was a warning to others not to stage similar demonstrations.

Wong Lok-to, Ding Wenqi: China Jails Nine Protesters From Guangdong’s Rebel Village of Wukan (Radio Free Asia)

Authorities in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong have handed down jail terms of up to 10 years to nine residents of the rebel village of Wukan following months of mass protests earlier in the year.
Wei Yonghan, Yang Jinzhen, Hong Yongzhong, Wu Fang, Zhuang Songkun, Cai Jialin, Li Chulu, Chen Suzhuan, and Zhang Bingchai stood trial on Dec. 17, mostly on a variety of public order charges, former Wukan resident Zhuang Liehong told RFA.
They were handed prison sentences in on Monday ranging from two to 10 years, he said.
Prosecutors said fellow protester Zhang Bingchai had „published false information via WeChat and manufactured rumors, which had a deleterious effect in the community.“
Wei Yonghan and Yang Jinzhen were found guilty of „organizing and inciting the villagers of Wukan to attend illegal meetings, demonstrations.“
Wei was also convicted of inciting villagers and „other members of the public“ to confrontation with police, throwing stones and bricks at them, and injuring police officers on duty.
Meanwhile, protesters Li Chulu, Cai Jialin, and Zhuang Songkun „rode their motorcycles to intercept passing vehicles, causing serious disruption to traffic,“ according to an indictment notice issued by the Haifeng District People’s Court, which tried them.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom, David Bandurski: From Diamond Village to Wukan (Los Angeles Review of Books)

Protests broke out again in Wukan a couple of months ago after the democratically elected leader of the village, Lin Zulian, was jailed for corruption. He made a public confession on Chinese state television. When the villagers staged more protests in response to what all signs point to as a spurious prosecution and a forced public confession, riot police moved in, arresting villagers. Anxious to avoid a repeat of events in 2011, the authorities were also far more aggressive in dealing with foreign journalists trying to cover the story. I think this was retribution, four years delayed, against the village of Wukan for an experiment many Communist Party leaders surely saw as a dangerous precedent.
This experiment was, in my view, doomed from the start. How could the elected leaders possibly hope to resolve these land issues when leaders at every level over their heads had been complicit, and not only hoped their experiment would fail but had a clear interest in seeing land deals of this kind continue? The Financial Times reported in 2011 that 40 percent of local government revenue in this part of Guangdong came from land financing, basically the sale of cheap village land to property developers. In many cities, the percentage is even higher, and the incentive to take village land for profit is a huge driver of the kinds of cases of abuse and resistance I document.

Qiao Long, Zhuang Liehong: ‚We Called on Trump For Justice in Wukan‘ (Radio Free Asia)
Rammie Chui, Zoe Lai: Behind the scenes: The mainland journalist who writes about China’s human rights (Hong Kong Free Press)

Südchinesisches Meer
Dez 17th, 2016 by Gao

Julian Borger: Chinese warship seizes US underwater drone in international waters (Guardian)

The Chinese navy has seized an underwater drone in plain sight of the American sailors who had deployed it in international waters, in a seemingly brazen message to the incoming Trump administration.
According to a US defence official, the unmanned glider had come to the surface of the water in the South China Sea and was about to be retrieved by the USNS Bowditch, an oceanographic and surveillance ship, when a Chinese naval vessel that had been shadowing the Bowditch put a small boat in the water…
As China develops a strategic submarine fleet, with the potential to carry nuclear missiles out into the Pacific Ocean, the US has built up a monitoring network designed to spot Chinese submarines as they leave their bases. Drones are key to the network, and there is a race under way between major naval powers to develop drones that can work together in swarms and “see” long distances through the water. Underwater gliders are drones that can stay underwater on the lookout for submarines for long periods of time.

AP: China and US in talks over seized drone, officials say (Guardian)

The device was being operated by civilian contractors to conduct oceanic research, according to the Pentagon.

AP: Philippines to ’set aside‘ South China Sea tribunal ruling to avoid imposing on Beijing (Guardian)

The Philippine president has said he would “set aside” a ruling by an international arbitration tribunal that invalidated Beijing’s claims to most of the South China Sea, because he doesn’t want to impose on China.
“In the play of politics, now, I will set aside the arbitral ruling. I will not impose anything on China,” Rodrigo Duterte said at a news conference on Saturday.

Tom Phillips: Images show ’significant‘ Chinese weapons systems in South China Sea (Guardian)

China appears to have positioned “significant” weapons systems, including anti-aircraft and anti-missile systems, on all seven of the artificial islands it has built in the South China Sea, despite vowing it had no intention of militarising the archipelago, a US thinktank has claimed.

Xinhua: China says deployment of defensive facilities on South China Sea islands legitimate (Global Times)
Tom Phillips: ‚Friends forever‘? China wary of Rex Tillerson wooing away Russia (Guardian)

Rex Tillerson’s controversial nomination as secretary of state has delighted Moscow where the Texan oilman has deep and long-standing ties. Donald Trump’s choice of the ExxonMobil chief was “100% good news” for Vladimir Putin, one opposition politician claimed.
But in Beijing, already reeling from Trump’s early forays into foreign policy, the move has inspired no such celebration, instead fuelling fears that the president-elect’s courtship of the Kremlin could be part of a bold strategic bid to isolate China.

Krieg gegen China?
Dez 12th, 2016 by Gao

John Pilger: The Coming War on China (movie; RT)

A nuclear war between the United States and China is not only imaginable but a current ‘contingency’, says the Pentagon. This film by acclaimed filmmaker John Pilger’s is both a warning and an inspiring story of resistance.
The Coming War on China, filmed over two years across five potential flashpoints in Asia and the Pacific, reveals the build-up to war on more than 400 US military bases that encircle China in a ‘perfect noose’.
Using rare archive and remarkable interviews with witnesses, Pilger’s film discloses America’s secret history in the region – the destruction wrought by the equivalent of one Hiroshima every day for 12 years, and the top secret ‘Project 4.1’ that made guinea pigs of the population of the Marshall Islands.

Xinjiang
Dez 3rd, 2016 by Gao

Zhao Yusha: Xinjiang tightens passport policy to maintain social order (Global Times / archive.org – Das Original ist nicht mehr on-line.)

Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has tightened passport regulations, requiring all residents to hand in their passports to local police stations for examination and management.
An anonymous police officer in Aksu prefecture confirmed with the Global Times on Wednesday that all citizens in Aksu are required to hand their passports, be it a private passport or passport for public affairs, to the police stations. The passports will be managed by the police.
„Anyone who needs the passport must apply to the police station,“ said the source, adding that the passport management policy is implemented throughout Xinjiang.
The Public Security Bureau in Shihezi city gave the same directive on its official Weibo account on October 19, saying that it was for „annual examination“ purposes…
A local official in Xinjiang told the Global Times on Wednesday that the Xinjiang government had loosened control over residents‘ passports in 2015. The current policy tightening aims mainly to maintain social order, he noted.
Getting a passport is often complicated and takes more time in Xinjiang than in other provinces, given the rising threat of terrorism in the region and the government’s ongoing anti-terrorism campaign, said the official.

China sammelt Pässe in Unruheprovinz ein (Zeit)

Die Einwohner von Xinjiang dürfen nicht mehr beliebig ausreisen. Sie müssen ihre Reisepässe abgeben. Die muslimische Minderheit spricht von Unterdrückung.

Xinjiang residents told to turn in passports (AlJazeera)

In June, local state-run media reported that the mostly Kazakh residents of a Xinjiang border district had to give police DNA samples, fingerprints, voiceprints and a „three-dimensional image“ in order to apply for certain travel documents, including passports.

Lucy Hornby: China orders Xinjiang residents to hand in passports (Financial Times)
Passports Arbitrarily Recalled in Xinjiang (Human Rights Watch)

The passport recall in Xinjiang has no basis in Chinese law.
Article 2 of China’s Passport Law states that “no organization or individual should illegally … seize passports.” Article 15 states that the courts, the procuratorates [office of the prosecutor], the police, the state security, and administrative supervisory authorities can seize passports only “where necessary for handling a case,” and only the passports “of the parties of a case.”

Zhao Yusha, Cui Meng: Xinjiang officials deny holding ordinary citizens’ passports (Global Times)

Sources from Xinjiang police denied that the government is holding ordinary citizens‘ passports, noting that the government only holds passports of those who are suspected of having links to terrorism.
A source from Urumqi, capital of Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, told the Global Times that local police are not holding residents‘ passports except for those with suspicious connections.
The source in Urumqi said that some local governments in Xinjiang may have misunderstood the passport management policy.

Medienkritik
Nov 22nd, 2016 by Gao

Yoav Haifawi: The Economist in China’s Wonderland (Free Haifa)

On November 12th 2016 The Economist published a short report from Shenzhen about what seems as a totally boring subject: Chinese courier firms. It comes, as usual, under a patronizing title “China’s express-delivery sector needs consolidation and modernization”. But it contains such a glaring and laughable combination of contradictions that I found it worth bringing here to you.

Trump
Nov 16th, 2016 by Gao

Cao Yaxue: Trump and Xi Jinping Haven’t Spoken, But China Outlines Expectations With Coaxing and Threats (ChinaChange)

On November 9, around 6:30 am EST (7:30 pm in Beijing), Chinese state news agency Xinhua reported that Chinese president Xi Jinping’s had sent the U. S. president-elect Donald Trump a “congratulatory telegram.” A telegram, really? How do you send a telegram to a New York billionaire in 2016? It sounds like Mao Zedong sending a telegram to comrade Enver Hoxha in Albania in 1961.

普京与特朗普通话,俄美关系要翻篇?(新京报)

两人均表达了改善俄美关系的意愿,同意建设“强劲而持久”的双边关系,积极推动两国关系正常化

张梦圆:和华裔精英聊聊 特朗普当选会怎样影响中美关系(搜狐新闻)
周浩:“特朗普时代”的中美新局(Financial Times)

美国在经济上强势可能带来外交上相对弱势,美国可能给予中国在亚太更大的主动权,以为经济发展蓄势。

Hongkong | Arzneimittel | Internet
Nov 9th, 2016 by Gao

全国人民代表大会常务委员会:关于《中华人民共和国香港特别行政区基本法》第一百零四条的解释(新华社)

《中华人民共和国香港特别行政区基本法》第一百零四条规定相关公职人员“就职时必须依法宣誓”,具有以下含义:
  (一)宣誓是该条所列公职人员就职的法定条件和必经程序。未进行合法有效宣誓或者拒绝宣誓,不得就任相应公职,不得行使相应职权和享受相应待遇。
  (二)宣誓必须符合法定的形式和内容要求。宣誓人必须真诚、庄重地进行宣誓,必须准确、完整、庄重地宣读包括“拥护中华人民共和国香港特别行政区基本法,效忠中华人民共和国香港特别行政区”内容的法定誓言。

Huang Zheping, Heather Timmons: Two democratically elected Hong Kong lawmakers have been banned from taking office by Beijing (Quartz)

China’s top law-making body issued a rare interpretation of the Basic Law that governs Hong Kong on Monday (Nov. 7) that effectively ousts two democratically elected officials from office permanently. The action by Beijing, which has increasingly tightened its grip on free speech and demonstrations in Hong Kong after 2014’s Umbrella Movement protests, could spark widespread protests in a city where demonstrators have already taken to the streets over the issue.
Yau Wai-ching and Baggio Leung, who represent the Youngspiration political party, won seats in September elections to Hong Kong’s Legislative Council (LegCo), but after using a derogatory term to refer to the mainland and declaring Hong Kong was not part of China during their swearing-in session in October, were barred from office. The Hong Kong government has legally challenged the validity of their oaths, but the interpretation by Beijing effectively supersedes Hong Kong’s local judicial system.
The interpretation, issued by Beijing’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee on Monday morning, states that when assuming office, lawmakers and principal officials others must “correctly, completely, and solemnly” swear according to the scripted oath, including the part saying “I will uphold the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China and bear allegiance to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China.”

Raymond Yeung, Danny Mok, Josh Ye, Clifford Lo, Elizabeth Cheung: Four arrested after violence at thousands-strong rally over Beijing’s review of Basic Law (South China Morning Post)

Traffic resumed early Monday on Des Voeux Road, marking the end of a tense stand-off overnight between police and protesters outside the central government’s liaison office in Sai Wan.
The clash between officers and the 4,000-strong crowd gathered in the area to protest against Beijing’s intervention in the oath-taking saga saw the use of pepper spray by police, while one officer was allegedly injured by protesters hurling bricks.
Police said in total four people were arrested, including two men and a woman, aged from 39 to 65, for allegedly obstructing police officers. League of Social Democrats chairman Avery Ng Man-yuen said on his Facebook account that he was among the arrested and had been released on bail.

Ellie Ng: ‘Protect the rule of law’: Beijing defends ruling that effectively bans pro-independence politicians (Hong Kong Free Press)
Editorial: A necessary intervention to keep separatists out of public office (South China Morning Post)
Eric Cheung, Tom Phillips: Hong Kong: lawyers and activists march against Beijing ‚meddling‘ (Guardian)

More than 2,000 lawyers and activists have paraded through Hong Kong in silence and dressed in black to protest against Beijing’s unprecedented intervention in the former British colony’s supposedly independent legal system as a means of ousting two democratically elected pro-independence politicians.

Ellie Ng: ‘World city no more’: Hong Kong professionals censure Beijing’s intervention in local laws (Hong Kong Free Press)

CRI: 324 arrested in China’s vaccine scandal so far (China Daily)

Another 27 suspects have been arrested for the vaccine scandal revealed last March in east China’s Shandong province, adding the total number of the arrested to 324.
The number is released by Cao Jianming, procurator-general of China’s Supreme People’s Procuratorate.
100 officials have been put under investigation under suspicion of taking bribes, abuse of power, and negligence, according to the authority.
The scandal which shocked and stunned the public was first unveiled in March, 2016.
The main suspect Pang Hongwei, a former pharmacist at a hospital in Shandong, and her 21-year-old daughter were found illegally selling 12 different kinds of vaccines, 2 kinds of immune globulin and one kind of therapeutic product across the country.

Sue-Lin Wong, Michael Martina: China adopts cyber security law in face of overseas opposition (Reuters)

China adopted a controversial cyber security law on Monday to counter what Beijing says are growing threats such as hacking and terrorism, but the law triggered concerns among foreign business and rights groups.
The legislation, passed by China’s largely rubber-stamp parliament and set to take effect in June 2017, is an „objective need“ of China as a major internet power, a parliament official said.
Overseas critics of the law say it threatens to shut foreign technology companies out of various sectors deemed „critical“, and includes contentious requirements for security reviews and for data to be stored on servers in China.
Rights advocates also say the law will enhance restrictions on China’s Internet, already subject to the world’s most sophisticated online censorship mechanism, known outside China as the Great Firewall…
Contentious provisions remained in the final draft issued by the parliament, including requirements for „critical information infrastructure operators“ to store personal information and important business data in China, provide unspecified „technical support“ to security agencies, and pass national security reviews.

Paul Mozur: China’s Internet Controls Will Get Stricter, to Dismay of Foreign Business (New York Times)

In August, business groups around the world petitioned China to rethink a proposed cybersecurity law that they said would hurt foreign companies and further separate the country from the internet…
Officials say the rules will help stop cyberattacks and help prevent acts of terrorism, while critics say they will further erode internet freedom. Business groups worry that parts of the law — such as required security checks on companies in industries like finance and communications, and mandatory in-country data storage — will make foreign operations more expensive or lock them out altogether. Individual users will have to register their real names to use messaging services in China.

Kaiser Kuo: Why are so many first-generation Chinese immigrants supporting Donald Trump? (SupChina)

Rassismus
Nov 1st, 2016 by Gao

APA: Merkel hält Oettinger als EU-Kommissar für ausgezeichnet qualifiziert (Standard)

Der deutsche Digitalkommissar hatte in einer Rede Chinesen als „Schlitzaugen“ bezeichnet

»Schlitzaugen«? Was ist schon dabei? Linksliberale österreichische Tageszeitungen können da locker mithalten:
Karl Fluch: Kontaminierte Landschaft im Speckgürtel (Standard, Titelseite)

Denkt man an Niederösterreich und dicke Luft, muss es nicht immer mit dem Stil des hochwohlgeborenen Regenten dieser Perle Österreichs zu tun haben. Wie jetzt erhoben und öffentlich gemacht wurde, hat Klosterneuburg die schlechteste Luftqualität des Landes…
Klosterneuburg als Opfer dieser Entwicklung bemerkt erste Auswirkungen des Studienergebnisses. So hat das Rathaus Peking bereits angefragt, ob Klostelneubulg nicht Partnerstadt werden möchte, man sei schließlich schon Luftwerteschwager.

(Hervorhebung BF)

Erneuerbare Energie
Okt 24th, 2016 by Gao

John A. Mathews: China’s Continuing Renewable Energy Revolution – latest trends in electric power generation (Japan Focus)

China has made strategic choices favouring renewables over fossil fuels that are still not widely understood or appreciated. Hao Tan and I have been making these arguments for several years now, and in particular in our article in Nature in September 2014 we argued that China had overwhelming economic and energy security reasons for opting in favour of renewables, in addition to the obvious environmental benefits.1 In this article I wish to take these arguments further and update the picture to incorporate comprehensive 2015 data as well as fresh targets for 2017 and 2020…
Of course the system as a whole is still largely black – that’s what 73% dependence on fossil fuels means. But the trend, the leading edge, is definitely headed in a green direction. Over the past decade, dependence on thermal sources reached a peak of 83.3% of power generated in the two years 2006 and 2007, and has been declining each year since to reach just 73.0% in 2015 – or a 10% decline in a decade. This is a remarkably swift shift for such a large technical system – particularly one that is growing rapidly – and is the basis for targets that see thermal sources accounting for just 63% by 2020 and less than 50% by 2030. By this time the total electric power system in China would be greener than blacker…
According to China’s National Energy Administration, China invested 139.6 billion yuan (around US$21 billion) in new coal-fired power stations in 2015. This is less than a fifth of the investment in clean energy sources. In the same briefing on the electricity sector in China in 2015 the NEA revealed that investment in hydro amounted to 78.2 billion yuan (or US$11.7 billion) and in nuclear power investment was 56 billion yuan (or US$8.4 billion). So it is safe to say that China’s green investment in renewable power sources in 2015 well surpassed investment in thermal sources.

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